Primary Relationships and Sex Education Policy (RSE)

CO-OP ACADEMY BROWNHILL:

PRIMARY RELATIONSHIPS AND SEX EDUCATION POLICY (RSE)

Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) Policy

Date created – 01/09/2020

Date reviewed – 01/09/2019

Next review date – 01/07/2020

Coop Academy Brownhill takes its responsibility to provide relevant, effective and responsible RSE to all of its pupils as part of the school’s personal, social, health, economic (PSHE) education curriculum very seriously. The school wants parents/carers and pupils to feel assured that RSE will be delivered at a level appropriate to both the age and development of pupils and safe to voice opinions and concerns relating to the RSE provision.

  1. Context – why RSE is important

We are required to teach Relationships Education and Health Education as part of our PSHE curriculum. Current regulations and guidance from the Department for Education (DfE) state that from September 2020, all schools must deliver Relationships Education and Health Education. High-quality Relationships Education, Health Education and RSE help create a safe school community in which our pupils can grow, learn and develop positive, healthy behaviour for life.

It is essential for the following reasons:

  • RSE plays a vital part in meeting the schools’ safeguarding obligations as outlined in the updated Keeping children safe in education – Statutory guidance for schools and colleges (September 2019) .
  • The DfE 2019 statutory guidance states that, from September 2020, all schools providing primary education, including all-through schools and middle schools must teach Relationships Education.
  • Children have a right to good quality education, as set out in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.
  • Children want to be prepared for the physical and emotional changes they undergo at puberty, and young people want to learn about relationships. Older pupils frequently say that Relationships and Sex Education was ‘too little, too late and too biological’. Ofsted reinforced this in their 2013 ‘Not Yet Good Enough report.’
  • Ofsted is clear that schools must have a preventative programme that enables pupils to learn about safety and risks in relationships.
  • National Curriculum: RSE plays an important part in fulfilling the statutory duties the school has to meet as section 2 of the National Curriculum framework (DfE, 2013) states
  • The Department of Health set out its ambition for all children to receive high quality Relationships and Sex Education in the Sexual Health Improvement Framework (2013), while the Department for Education’s paper, The Importance of Teaching (2010) highlighted that ‘Children need high quality Relationships and Sex Education so they can make wise and informed choices’ (p.46).
  • These duties are set out in the 2002 Education Act and the 2010 Academies Act. Whole school (Section 5) Ofsted inspections consider the extent to which a school provides such a curriculum.
  • Schools maintain a statutory obligation under the Children Act (2004) to promote their pupils’ emotional wellbeing, and improving their ability to achieve in school and under the Education Act (1996) to prepare children for the challenges, opportunities and responsibilities of adult life. A comprehensive RSE programme can have a positive impact on pupils’ health and wellbeing and their ability to achieve, and can play a crucial part in meeting these obligations.
  1. Development process

This policy was produced by Beverly Blanchfield (Headteacher), Nick Davenport (PSHCE Lead) in conjunction with the Leeds Health & Well Being Team

From September 2020, the law requires primary schools to consult on their Relationships Education policy. Any primary school choosing to teach Sex Education – which is recommended by the Department for Education but not required by the law – must have a policy on this as well and should consult parents on it.

Consultation must be carried out when the policy is formed and subsequently whenever it is updated. The Department for Education recommends that schools engage with parents on these policies on a regular basis, as the parent body does not remain static and the programme may need to be adapted to meet new needs and ensure continuous improvement. Schools will want to consider this and develop an approach that is proportionate to their needs.

Parents/carers were consulted through the school website, a survey in parent mail and through the weekly newsletter.  Further, parents are consulted annually and all resources and vocabulary is shared at a parents RSE consultation run by BigTalk education RSE providers. Teaching and non-teaching staff were consulted through staff meeting and CPD /training, and pupils were consulted through the student council. Governors were consulted through discussion of draft policy at initial and subsequent governors meetings. This policy has been approved and adopted by the head teacher and governing body. The member of staff responsible for overseeing and reviewing this policy is: Nick Davenport (PSHCE Lead) It will be reviewed briefly annually and in full every 2 – 3 years.

We are committed to the ongoing development of RSE in our school. We will use the following indicators to monitor and evaluate progress:

  • a coordinated and consistent approach to curriculum delivery has been adopted,
  • the content of the RSE curriculum is flexible and responsive to pupils’ differing needs e.g. through the use of pupil perception data such as the My Health My School Survey
  • children are receiving an entitlement curriculum for Relationships Education in line with DfE national statutory guidance and local guidance
  • children are receiving an entitlement curriculum for Sex Education in line with national and local guidance
  • there are clearly identified learning objectives for all RSE activities and pupils’ learning is assessed using small stakes quizzes against the knowledge mats for PSHCE (formative assessment) but also summative by assessing against to the ‘I can’ statements in reports.
  • opportunities for cross-curricular approaches are being used where appropriate
  • policy and practice is revised regularly and involves staff, governors, parents/carers and pupils
  • opportunities are provided for parents/carers and members of our community to consider the purpose and nature of our RSE, for example, through parent/carer information sessions/workshops from third party visitors
  • a variety of methods are employed to communicate the key points of the policy and curriculum to the community e.g. through the school website/newsletter
  1. Location and dissemination

This policy document is freely available on request to the whole school community. The policy is referred to in the school prospectus as well as in relevant areas of the curriculum. A copy of the policy can be found on the school website. A physical copy of the policy is available free of charge from the school office.

  1. Relationship to other policies

This policy supports/complements the following policies:

  • Attendance (in particular in relation to FGM)
  • Behaviour
  • Child Protection/Safeguarding Children (including FGM)
  • Equal Opportunities
  • E-safety/IT
  • First Aid
  • Health & Safety
  • Science
  • SEN/Inclusion
  • Teaching and Learning

Documents that inform the school’s RSE Policy include:

  • Education Act (1996)
  • Learning and Skills Act (2000)
  • Education and Inspections Act (2006)
  • Equality Act (2010)
  • Supplementary Guidance SRE for the 21st Century (2014)
  • Children and Social Work Act (2017)
  • DfE: Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) and Health Education: Statutory guidance for governing bodies, proprietors, head teachers, principals, senior leadership teams, teachers (2019)
  • Keeping children safe in education – statutory safeguarding guidance (2020)
  • United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child
  1. Definition

Relationships and Sex Education is learning about the emotional, social and physical aspects of growing up, relationships, sex, human sexuality and sexual health. Some aspects are taught in science, and others are taught as part of personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE).

A comprehensive programme of RSE provides accurate information about the body, reproduction, sex, and sexual health. It also gives children and young people essential skills for building positive, enjoyable, respectful and non-exploitative relationships and staying safe both on and offline.

  1. The principles of high-quality RSE in our school

Relationships and Sex Education:

  • is a partnership between home and school
  • ensures pupils’ views are actively sought to influence lesson planning and teaching
  • starts early and is relevant to pupils at each stage in their development and maturity
  • is taught by people who are trained and confident in talking about issues such as healthy and unhealthy relationships, equality, pleasure, respect, abuse, sexuality, gender identity, sex and consent
  • includes the acquisition of knowledge, the development of life skills and respectful attitudes and values
  • has sufficient time to cover a wide range of topics, with a strong emphasis on relationships, consent, rights, responsibilities to others, negotiation and communication skills, and accessing services
  • helps pupils understand on and offline safety, consent, violence and exploitation
  • is both medically and factually correct and treats sex as a normal and pleasurable fact of life
  • is inclusive of difference: gender identity, sexual orientation, special educational needs and disability, ethnicity, culture, age, faith or belief, or other life experience
  • uses active learning methods, and is rigorously planned, assessed and evaluated
  • helps pupils understand a range of views and beliefs about relationships and sex in a society which may differ to their own
  • teaches pupils about the law and their rights to confidentiality even if they are under 16
  • promotes equality in relationships, recognises and challenges gender inequality and reflects girls’ and boys’ different experiences and needs
  1. The overall school aims for RSE

Our approach to SE consists of a comprehensive and developmental programme of teaching and learning, which is delivered in the context of a Healthy School where the health and wellbeing of pupils and the whole school community are actively promoted. Our RSE programme has a positive influence on the ethos, learning and relationships throughout the school. It is central to our values and to achieving our school’s stated aims and objectives. Our RSE programme helps pupils to develop the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes they need to live confident, healthy, independent lives now and in the future.

Through the provision outlined in this policy, the school’s overall aims of RSE are to teach and develop the following main elements:

Attitudes and values:

  • Links effectively with our school’s cooperative values
  • learn the importance of individual conscience and moral considerations
  • learn the value of family life, marriage, and stable and loving relationships for the nurture of children
  • learn the value of respect, love and care
  • explore, consider and understand moral dilemmas
  • develop critical thinking as part of the decision-making

Personal and social skills:

  • Links effectively with our school’s cooperative values
  • learn to manage emotions and relationships confidently and sensitively
  • develop self-respect and empathy for others
  • learn to make choices based on an understanding of difference and with an absence of prejudice
  • develop an appreciation of the consequences of choices made
  • manage conflict
  • learn how to recognise and avoid exploitation and abuse

Knowledge and understanding:

  • learn and understand physical development at appropriate stages
  • understand human sexuality, reproduction, sexual health, emotions and relationships
  • learn about contraception and the range of local and national sexual health advice, contraception and support services
  • learn the reasons for delaying sexual activity, and the benefits to be gained from such delay, including the avoidance of unplanned pregnancy

In addition to this, we also aim to:

  • raise pupils’ self-esteem and confidence
  • develop communication and assertiveness skills that can help them stay true to their values if challenged by others, their peers or what they see in the media
  • teach pupils to be accepting of the different beliefs, cultures, religions, sexual orientations, gender identity, physical and mental abilities, backgrounds and values of those around them
  • support pupils to lead a healthy and safe lifestyle, teaching them to care for, and respect, their bodies
  • provide pupils with the right tools to enable them to seek information or support, should they need it
  • teach pupils about consent and their right to say no, in an age appropriate manner
  • to teach lessons that are sensitive to a range of views, values and beliefs
  • ensure that staff teaching RSE remain neutral in their delivery whilst ensuring that pupils always have access to the learning they need to stay safe, healthy and understand their rights as individuals

The aim of RSE is NOT to:

  • To encourage pupils to become sexually active at a young age
  • promote a particular sexual orientation or gender identity
  • sexualise children

RSE does not sexualise children; it is part of the solution to concerns about sexualisation. The evidence that good quality RSE delays sexual activity can be summarised here: https://www.ncb.org.uk/sites/default/files/uploads/documents/Blog_reports/sef_doesRSEwork_2010.pdf

  1. The wider context of RSE

The school’s RSE programme will:

  • be an integral part of the lifelong learning process, beginning in early childhood and continuing into adult life
  • be an entitlement for all pupils, including those with additional learning and language needs
  • be set within the wider school context and support family commitment and love, respect and affection, knowledge and openness
  • recognise that family is a broad concept; not just one model, e.g. nuclear family
  • encourage pupils and teachers to share and respect each other’s views with cultural awareness and sensitivity
  • ensure pupils are aware of different approaches to sexual orientation, without promotion of any particular family structure
  • recognise that parents/carers are the key people in teaching their children about relationships, sex and growing up
  • work in partnership with parents/carers and pupils, consulting them about the content of the programme
  • work in partnership with other health professionals, specialist visitors to school and the wider community

RSE contributes to:

  • a positive ethos and environment for learning
  • safeguarding pupils (Children Act 2004), promoting their emotional wellbeing, and improving their ability
  • to achieve in school
  • a better understanding of diversity and inclusion, a reduction in gender-based and homophobic, bi-phobic, transphobic (HBT) prejudice, bullying and violence and an understanding of the difference between consenting and exploitative relationships
  • helping pupils keep themselves safe from harm, both on and offline, enjoy their relationships and build confidence in accessing services if they need help and advice
  • reducing early sexual activity, teenage conceptions, sexually transmitted infections, sexual exploitation and abuse, domestic violence and bullying.
  1. Key rights and responsibilities for Relationships and Sex Education

The policy applies to:

  • The headteacher
  • All school staff
  • The governing body
  • Pupils
  • Parents/carers
  • health professionals
  • Specialist partner agencies working in or with the school

The headteacher is responsible for ensuring that RSE is taught consistently across the school, and for managing requests to withdraw pupils from non-statutory components of RSE (see appendix 3)

Specific responsibilities

 

Who – role?

E.g. PSHE lead, headteacher, CP designated teacher

Co-ordinating the RSE provision, ensuring a spiral curriculum PSHCE Lead
Accessing and coordinating training and support for staff PSHCE Lead / Headteacher
Establishing and maintaining links with external agencies/other health professionals  PSHCE Lead / Head, CP lead
Policy development and review, including consultation and dissemination Headteacher / PSHCE Lead
Implementation of the policy; monitoring and assessing its effectiveness in practice PSHCE Lead / Headteacher
Managing child protection/safeguarding issues CP Lead / Headteacher
Establishing and maintaining links with parents/carers CP Lead / Learning Mentor / Headteacher / All staff
Liaising with link schools to ensure a smooth transition Y6 Staff
Liaising with the media Headteacher
  1. Language

 Pupils will be taught the anatomical terms for body parts. Slang or everyday terms used in certain social circles will be discussed; this will surround discussion about what is and isn’t the acceptable language to use. This will be shared with parents/carers before it is delivered in class through a parental drop-in session from specialist RSE company ‘BigTalk’ education.

An agreed list of vocabulary used in school:

Vocabulary (list of examples but not exhaustive):
  Will be used

The words and phrases below will be used by adults and children in the teaching and learning process.

May arise

We do not plan to teach but it but language may arise e.g. to re-visit some learning, to clarify or re-teach some aspects.

Reception Family, friends, Trusted Adult, private areas, mouth, chest, penis, vagina, bottom, Gay (Men who love men) Lesbian. (Women who love women)

Washing ourselves, secrets v. surprises, programmes that are just for adults

Year 1 Family, friends, Trusted Adult, private areas, mouth, chest, penis, vagina, bottom, Gay (Men who love men) Lesbian. (Women who love women)

Washing ourselves, secrets v. surprises, programmes that are just for adults

Names of current popular Internet games.
Year 2 As above plus, some people feel different on the inside to the outside, gender. Biological difference between boys and girls: vagina, penis, breasts, testicles, clitoris.  People we don’t know on the Internet. Selfies. Appropriate & inappropriate photos, websites, programmes etc. Dares, Age ratings on social media, films, games etc.
Year 3 As above, homosexual, bi-sexual, gender roles, homophobia
Year 4 As above plus, families, step-families, fostering, adoption, marriage.

Our bodies, including puberty changes, mood swings, hormones, emotions, body hair, periods,  menstruation, erections, nocturnal emissions, wet dreams, ejaculations, foreskin, infection, testosterone, oestrogen, pads, Genitals, bladder, anus, urethra, testicles, penis, vagina, Sperm, ovum, clitoris,  uterus, womb, sex, making love, conception, Love, Relationship, Family, Supportive, Caring, Loving, Consent, Labour, birth, cervix, natural birth, caesarean,

Transgender, Transphobic, Biphobic, Homophobia, Transphobia, Biphobia, LGBT+
Year 5 As above, with more time for questions and clarification.

Homosexual, Heterosexual, Transgender, Bisexual, Homophobic, Transphobic, Biphobic, Homophobia, Transphobia, Biphobia, LGBT+ gender stereotyping

Questions regarding sex and the Law.
Year 6 As above, with more time for questions and clarification. Contraception, STD’s / HIV Questions on same-sex parents

We will alert parents as to when anatomical terms are likely to be used in class. However, we might need to use the terms at other times, such as when dealing with incidents of misuse or disrespectful language and at a later point in the year for consolidation, follow up work and as part of our existing Scheme of Work.

We will consider how pupils who are new to English will be supported in accessing and understanding the language used in RSE lessons. E.g. Pre-teach vocab, the use of images, repetition, simplified terms and a translation dictionary.

Respectful Language

The use of respectful language which challenges sexism, homophobia and other forms of prejudice will be established in RSE but will have benefits for the whole school community, both in and out of lessons; it helps to ensure we are a happy and healthy place to learn. Ofsted found that casual use of homophobic language in schools is often unchallenged (2013) – we always challenge it. The casual use of homophobic, biphobic and transphobic language in school will be challenged and pupils will be made aware that using the word ‘gay’ to mean something is rubbish is wrong and will not be tolerated. To tackle this, staff might say: ‘you’ve used the word ‘gay’, but not in the right way.’

As a result, pupils will hear references to, for example, ‘gay,’ ‘straight’ and different kinds of relationships as part of teaching and assemblies, for example when we talk about rights, respect or relationships.

  1. Answering questions

In order to promote a healthy, positive atmosphere for RSE school want to ensure that pupils can ask questions freely, confident that they will be answered, and be sure that they will be free from bullying or harassment from other pupils. We believe that children are best educated, protected from harm and exploitation by discussing issues openly within the context of the RSE programme.

We acknowledge that potentially sensitive or controversial issues will arise as pupils will naturally share information and ask questions. ‘They will often ask their teachers or other adults questions pertaining to sex or sexuality which go beyond what’s set off for Relationships Education. We also acknowledge that children of the same age may be developmentally at different stages leading to different types of questions or behaviours.’

When spontaneous discussions arise, it is guided in a way that reflects the stated school aims and curriculum content for RSE. As a first principle, we answer questions relating to taught, the planned curriculum for that age group to the whole class. We answer questions, where appropriate, relating to areas beyond the taught, the planned curriculum for that age group, in a sensitive and age-appropriate way, only to the pupil or pupils who have asked the question. If a member of staff is uncertain about the answer to a question, or indeed whether they should answer it, they will seek guidance from the Headteacher/ RSE leader/ Child Protection Officer. Questions may be referred to parents/carers if it is not appropriate to answer them in school. We will also use a question box where questions may be asked anonymously.

When answering questions, we ensure that sharing personal information by adults, pupils or their families is discouraged. Where a question or comment from a pupil in the classroom indicates the possibilities of abuse or risk of harm, teachers will pass this information to the designated person for safeguarding and child protection, in line with school policy and procedures.

Teaching staff will be familiar with the content and resources of BigTalk Education’s ‘Growing up Safe’ programme through shadow training, therefore should be equipped to answer questions resulting from the GUS sessions or during delivery of the schools RSE curriculum. Should questions of concern arise that teaching staff are uncertain how to answer, support can be sought from the Headteacher / PSHE Coordinator or BigTalk Education in order to give an age-appropriate answer.

Staff training sessions on how to deal with difficult questions will be arranged for staff that are un-confident. Agreed phrases, where appropriate, will be used in response to difficult questions. Phrases we will use are: ‘Can you put write that down and put it in the question box, I will answer it later’ ‘I can only answer questions on the content of this lesson’ or ‘That is something that may be covered later on.’

Ground rules are essential when discussing sensitive subject matters. Staff will establish clear parameters about what is appropriate and inappropriate in a whole-class setting by for example:

  • staff will set the tone by speaking in a matter-of-fact way
  • pupils will be encouraged to write down questions, anonymously if desired and post them in a question box or ask-it basket
  • staff will have time to prepare answers to all questions before the next session and will choose not to respond in a whole-class setting to any questions that are inappropriate or need one-to-one follow up
  • if a verbal question is too personal, staff will remind the pupils of the ground rules
  • if a question is too explicit, feels too old for a pupil, is inappropriate for the whole class, or raises concerns, staff will acknowledge it and promise to attend to it later on an individual basis
  • staff will not provide more information than is appropriate to the age/developmental level of the pupil
  • if staff are concerned that a pupil is at risk of abuse, the designated teacher will be informed and the usual child protection procedures followed
  1. Key responsibilities for RSE
  1. All staff

All staff will:

  • ensure that they are up to date with school policy and curriculum requirements regarding RSE
  • attend and engage in professional development training around RSE provision, including individual and whole staff training/inset, where appropriate
  • attend staff meetings to be introduced to any new areas of work and review the effectiveness of the approaches used
  • report back to the RSE Coordinator on any areas that they feel are not covered or inadequately provided for in the school’s RSE provision
  • encourage pupils to communicate concerns regarding their social, personal and emotional development in confidence and listen to their needs and support them
  • follow the school’s reporting systems if a pupil comes to a member of staff with an issue that they feel they are not able to deal with alone
  • ensure that their personal beliefs and attitudes will not prevent them from providing balanced RSE in school
  • tailor their lessons to suit all pupils in their class, across the whole range of abilities, faiths, beliefs, culture, gender identity and sexual orientations, including SEND
  • ask for support in this from the school SEND coordinator or the RSE Coordinator, should they need it
  1. Lead member/s of staff

The lead member/s of staff will receive training in their role and responsibilities. This supports them to lead on the development of the school’s policy and practice and to monitor its implementation. This practice includes the curriculum and approaches to teaching and learning, as well as whole-school approaches to health and wellbeing.

The lead member/s of staff will:

  • develop the school policy and review it on a yearly basis
  • ensure all members of the governing body are clear about the RSE curriculum
  • ensure that all staff are given regular and ongoing training on issues relating to RSE as well as how to deliver lessons on such issues
  • ensure that all staff are up to date with policy changes, and familiar with school policy and guidance relating to RSE, including new staff or supply staff
  • provide support and appropriate training to staff members who feel uncomfortable or ill-equipped to deal with the delivery of RSE to pupils
  • ensure that RSE is a spiral curriculum, age-appropriate and needs-led across all year groups; this means ensuring that the curriculum develops as the pupils do and meet their needs
  • ensure that the knowledge and information regarding RSE to which all pupils are entitled is provided in a comprehensive way
  • support parent/carer involvement in the development of the RSE curriculum
  • ensure that their personal beliefs, values and attitudes will not prevent them from providing balanced RSE in school
  • communicate freely with staff, parents/carers and the governing body to ensure that everyone is in the understanding of the school policy and curriculum for RSE and that any concerns or opinions regarding the provision at the school are listened to, taken into account and acted on as appropriate
  • Share the school’s provision for RSE with parents/carers in order to ensure they can support this at home
  • communicate to parents/carers any additional support that is available from the school to support them with RSE at home
  • Governors

The governing body as a whole plays an active role in monitoring, developing and reviewing the policy and its implementation in the school. The named link governor for RSE is (………………………….) who works closely with, and in support of, the lead member/s of staff. When aspects of RSE appear in the School Improvement Plan, a governor will be assigned to reflect on, monitor and review the work as appropriate.

As well as fulfilling their legal obligations, the governing body will also make sure that:

  • all pupils make progress in achieving the expected educational outcomes
  • the subjects are well-led, effectively managed and well planned
  • the quality of provision is subject to regular and effective self-evaluation
  • teaching is delivered in ways that are accessible to all pupils with SEND
  • clear information is provided for parents on the subject content and the right to request that their child is withdrawn from appropriate areas
  • the subjects are resourced, staffed and timetabled in a way that ensures that the school can fulfil its legal obligations
  1. Pupils

All pupils:

  • are expected to attend the statutory National Curriculum Science elements of the RSE curriculum and the statutory Relationships Education and Health Education curriculum
  • should support one another with issues that arise through RSE by, for example, alerting relevant members of staff to any potential worries or issues
  • will listen in class, be considerate of other people’s feelings and beliefs and comply with the ground rules that are set in class
  • will have the opportunity to talk to a member of staff, in confidence, regarding any concerns they have in school-related to RSE or otherwise
  • will be asked for feedback on the school’s RSE provision through the annual MyHealthMySchool survey and be expected to take this responsibility seriously; opinions on provision and comments will be reviewed by the lead member of staff for RSE and taken into consideration when the curriculum is prepared for the following year’s pupils
  1. Parents/carers

The role of parents in the development of their children’s understanding about relationships is vital. Parents are the first teachers of their children. They have the most significant influence in enabling their children to grow and mature and to form healthy relationships.

The school will:

  • ensure that parents/carers know what will be taught and when, and clearly communicate the fact that parents have the right to request that their child be withdrawn from some or all of sex education delivered as part of RSE
  • give parents/carers every opportunity to understand the purpose and content of Relationships Education and RSE through parent information sessions
  • communicate and give opportunities for parents/carers to understand and ask questions about the school’s approach to help increase confidence in the curriculum
  • build a good relationship with parents/carers on these subjects over time by inviting parents into school to discuss what will be taught, address any concerns and help support them in managing conversations with their children on these issues
  • encourage parents/carers to create an open home environment where pupils can engage, discuss and continue to learn about matters that have been raised through RSE
  • will reach out to all parents, including those who are hard to engage, recognising that a range of approaches may be needed for doing so

The right to withdraw

Parents/carers cannot withdraw their child from the statutory sex education content included in the National Curriculum for Science which includes content on human development, including reproduction. Parents/carers also cannot withdraw their child from Relationships Education or Health Education because it is important that all children receive this content, covering topics such as friendships, how to stay safe and puberty. However, they do have the right to request that their child be withdrawn from some or all of sex education delivered as part of the non-statutory RSE, delivered as part of the PSHE curriculum.

Requests for withdrawal should be put in writing using and addressed to the headteacher. Before granting any such the headteacher will discuss this request with parents/carers and, as appropriate, with the child to ensure that their wishes are understood and to clarify the nature and purpose of the curriculum. This process will be documented to ensure a record is kept

The headteacher and, preceding their annual visit, specialist providers from ‘BigTalk’ RSE education will also discuss with parents/carers the benefits of receiving this important education and any detrimental effects that withdrawal might have on the child. This will include any social and emotional effects of being excluded, as well as the likelihood of the child hearing their peers’ version of what was said in the classes, rather than what was directly said by the teacher. Children will no doubt hear about the content of sessions from other pupils and this may not be in a supportive, controlled or safe environment. They may also seek out their own information via the internet, which may result in them finding out incorrect information and possibly put them in an unsafe situation.  Pupils may also be stigmatised for not being included in these sessions.

RSE is a vital part of the school curriculum and supports child development and we strongly advise parents/carers to carefully consider their decision before withdrawing their child from this aspect of school life. It is acknowledged however that the final decision on the issue is for the parents/carers to take and the child and family should not be stigmatised for the decision.

The school provides an annual ‘drop-in’ session to share resources and answer any question and this is coordinated between the school and the RSE specialist provider ‘BigTalk.’  Termly curriculum newsletters, weekly newsletters and the school website can give further information on understanding Relationships Education. Support materials for home use will also be offered.

  1. Staff Support & CPD

It is important that all staff feel comfortable to deliver RSE lessons. The school provides regular professional development training in how to deliver RSE in light of the new statutory objectives.  Staff, including non-teaching staff, CPD needs are identified and met through the following ways:

  • an audit of staff CPD needs will be completed each year or at appropriate times throughout the year by the PSHCE lead
  • training and support is organised by the PSHCE lead / Headteacher
  • staff will be offered generic RSE training which includes sessions on confidentiality, creating ground rules, handling controversial issues, responding to awkward questions , an introduction to the rationale of why teaching RSE is so important, current law and guidance, learning outcomes and school policy.
  • staff involved in the delivery of issues seen as potentially more sensitive will be offered appropriate training to encourage confidence in dealing with matters of confidentiality, child protection, sensitive issues and potentially difficult questions
  • External providers such as BigTalk education and the Health and Well Being Team may support in meeting staff training needs.
  1. RSE Provision

Statutory aspects of Sex Education within the National Curriculum Science

All schools must teach the following as part of the National Curriculum Science; parents/carers do not have the right to withdraw their child/children from this.

National Curriculum Science:

Key Stage 1:

●        identify, name, draw and label the basic parts of the human body and say which part of the body is associated with each sense

●        notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults

●        describe the importance for humans of hygiene

Key Stage 2:

●        describe the differences in the life cycles of a mammal, an amphibian, an insect and a bird

●        describe the life process of reproduction in some plants and animals

●        describe the changes as humans develop to old age

Statutory aspects of Relationships Education: (taught through use of You, Me & PSHCE Scheme)

Families and people who care for me ●        that families are important for children growing up because they can give love, security and stability.

●        the characteristics of healthy family life, commitment to each other, including in times of difficulty, protection and care for children and other family members, the importance of spending time together and sharing each other’s lives.

●        that others’ families, either in school or in the wider world, sometimes look different from their family, but that they should respect those differences and know that other children’s families are also characterised by love and care.

Caring friendships ●        how important friendships are in making us feel happy and secure, and how people choose and make friends.

●        the characteristics of friendships, including mutual respect, truthfulness, trustworthiness, loyalty, kindness, generosity, trust, sharing interests and experiences and support with problems and difficulties.

●        that healthy friendships are positive and welcoming towards others, and do not make others feel lonely or excluded.

●        that most friendships have ups and downs, and that these can often be worked through so that the friendship is repaired or even strengthened, and that resorting to violence is never right.

●        how to recognise who to trust and who not to trust, how to judge when a friendship is making them feel unhappy or uncomfortable, managing conflict, how to manage these situations and how to seek help or advice from others, if needed.

Respectful relationships ●        the importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them (for example, physically, in character, personality or backgrounds), or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs.

●        practical steps they can take in a range of different contexts to improve or support respectful relationships.

●        the conventions of courtesy and manners.

●        the importance of self-respect and how this links to their own happiness.

●        that in school and in wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due respect to others, including those in positions of authority.

●        about different types of bullying (including cyberbullying), the impact of bullying, responsibilities of bystanders (primarily reporting bullying to an adult) and how to get help.

●        what a stereotype is, and how stereotypes can be unfair, negative or destructive.

●        the importance of permission-seeking and giving in relationships with friends, peers and adults.

Online relationships ●        that people sometimes behave differently online, including by pretending to be someone they are not.

●        that the same principles apply to online relationships as to face-to-face relationships, including the importance of respect for others online including when we are anonymous.

●        the rules and principles for keeping safe online, how to recognise risks, harmful content and contact, and how to report them.

●        how to critically consider their online friendships and sources of information including awareness of the risks associated with people they have never met.

●        how information and data is shared and used online.

Being safe ●        what sorts of boundaries are appropriate in friendships with peers and others (including in a digital context).

●        about the concept of privacy and the implications of it for both children and adults; including that it is not always right to keep secrets if they relate to being safe.

●        that each person’s body belongs to them, and the differences between appropriate and inappropriate or unsafe physical, and other, contact.

●        how to respond safely and appropriately to adults they may encounter (in all contexts, including online) whom they do not know.

●        how to recognise and report feelings of being unsafe or feeling bad about any adult.

●        how to ask for advice or help for themselves or others, and to keep trying until they are heard.

●        how to report concerns or abuse, and the vocabulary and confidence needed to do so.

●        where to get advice e.g. family, school and/or other sources.

 Statutory aspects of Health Education (which apply to RSE)

Health and prevention ●        about personal hygiene and germs including bacteria, viruses, how they are spread and treated, and the importance of handwashing.

 

Changing adolescent body ●        key facts about puberty and the changing adolescent body, particularly from age 9 through to age 11, including physical and emotional changes.

●        about menstrual wellbeing including the key facts about the menstrual cycle.

 Non-statutory Sex Education programme beyond the National Curriculum Science

 Parents/carers do have the right to withdraw their child/children from this.

 Human Reproduction:

  • About the structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems,
  • that women have ovum and men produce sperm, when these combine a baby can be made, this is called ‘sex’,
  • information on human gestation and birth.
  • Details on conception (how a baby is made) and the functional act of making love
  • how babies develop (including twins) and are born.

The needs of pupils

We recognise that an interactive approach to RSE will better develop the skills of our pupils and also that it is more likely to meet their needs. Through the school council, we involve pupils in the planning, development and evaluation of their RSE in ways appropriate to their age, stage and development.

 We will involve pupils through:

  • discussions with small groups of pupils during pupil interviews
  • questionnaires/surveys (e.g. the My Health My School Survey)
  • pre and post-assessment activities for RSE
  • school council meetings which ensure all pupils have a voice in the process

 Topics to be covered

 RSE needs to start early so that children learn about different kinds of relationships like families and friendships and so they can recognise if other people make them feel uncomfortable or unsafe. Lots of children start puberty before they leave primary school so it is important that all pupils know what to expect before it happens. We ensure RSE is taught in every year through ‘BigTalk’ education and also in Years 2, 4, 5 and 6 through the Islington Council spiral scheme of work. This helps pupils to learn progressively as they mature and revisit the subject on a regular basis, to reinforce learning and provide opportunities to ask further questions.

The Relationships Education, Health education and RSE curriculum we follow within PSHE is shown in Appendix 4a

Delivery of RSE

 Pupils receive their entitlement for RSE through a spiral curriculum, in timetabled slots, which demonstrates progression. The RSE programme is delivered through a variety of opportunities including:

  • designated RSE time
  • use of external agencies/services
  • Coop ethos / learning hats / STARS
  • small group work and anecdotal/ad-hoc gap-filling activities
  • cross-curricular links e.g. science, history, RE
  • assemblies
  • enrichment days/theatre performances

Working with visitors and other external agencies

Where appropriate, we may use visitors from external agencies or members of the community to support RSE. Working with external organisations enhances the delivery of RSE, bringing in specialist knowledge, which gives different ways of engaging with our pupils.

Our school works with BigTalk Education; an award-winning team of specialist RSE facilitators led by Lynnette Smith, who is the Chair of the Sex Education Forum’s Advisory Group (the SEF is part of the National Children’s Bureau). BigTalk Education’s Growing Up Safe: Whole School Approach (GUS programme) has been recognised by the Family Planning Association and Children and Young People Now Awards as a Finalist in their Safeguarding Award. The BigTalk team deliver to each class within school. (See appendix 4 for the curriculum that will be used). It is a spiral curriculum therefore pupils will see the same topics throughout their school career, with each encounter increasing in complexity and reinforcing previous learning. Consequently, the topics included for Nursery and KS1 are included right the way up until year 6. Teaching staff observe the BigTalk Education RSE lessons as part of their CPD programme to ensure they can reinforce the lesson content and answer any follow-up questions throughout the academic year.

We will ensure that the teaching delivered by the visitor fits with our planned programme and policy. We will discuss the detail of how the visitor will deliver their sessions and ensure that the content is age-appropriate and accessible for our pupils. We will ask to see the materials visitors will use as well as a lesson plan in advance so that we can ensure it meets the full range of pupils’ needs.

We will agree in advance of the session how confidentiality will work in any lesson and how a safeguarding report should be dealt with by the external visitor. It is also important that children understand how confidentiality will be handled in a lesson and what might happen if they choose to make a report.

The use of specialist visitors will be to enhance and enrich teaching, rather than as a replacement for teaching.

Before involving visitors in any aspect of RSE, teachers will ensure that:

  • the visitor understands the school’s confidentiality policy, values and approach to the educational programme
  • the visitor understands the emotional, intellectual, cultural, religious, social and ability level of the pupils involved, including where there may be a specific issue relating to child protection
  • the teacher needs to be part of the experience in order for the pupils to value the lessons and to build on the pupils’ learning after the session/s as well as answer any questions the pupils may subsequently have
  • where an organisation doesn’t have its own organisation protocol we will use the one in appendix

Monitoring and evaluating visitors’ and external agencies’ contributions

Use appendix only iff unconfident of own monitoring

Inclusion, equality and diversity

We are required by law to comply with relevant requirements of the Equality Act 2010. All pupils are entitled to quality RSE that helps them build confidence and a positive sense of self, and to stay healthy. We include all pupils regardless of their age, sex, race, disability, religion or belief, gender reassignment, or sexual orientation.

All classes include pupils with different abilities and aptitudes, experiences, religious/cultural backgrounds, gender and sexual identities. To encourage pupils to participate in lessons, teachers will ensure content, approach and use of inclusive language reflects the diversity of the school community and helps each and every pupil to feel valued and included in the classroom.

We promote the needs and interest of all pupils. The school’s approaches to teaching and learning take into account all needs of the pupils to ensure all can access the full RSE provision. We promote social learning and expect our pupils to show a high regard for the needs of others. RSE is an important vehicle for addressing controversial and sensitive issues and ensuring equal opportunities for all.

Responding to pupils’ diverse learning needs:

Considerations will be made for:

  • religious and cultural diversity
  • differing gender needs and abilities, including SEND
  • diverse sexuality of pupils
  • homophobic/transphobic/biophobic bullying and behaviour
  • pupil’s age and physical and emotional maturity
  • pupils who are new to English

Ethnicity, religion and cultural diversity:

Our policy values the different backgrounds of all pupils in school and, in acknowledging and exploring different views and beliefs, seeks to promote respect and understanding. We encourage respect for all religions and cultures. We do not ask pupils to represent the views of a particular religious or cultural group to their peers unless they choose to do so.

Single-gender groups:

Our policy is sensitive to the needs of different groups. For some pupils, it may be more appropriate for them to be taught particular topics in single-gender groups. We will consult parents/carers and pupils both on what is included, and on how it is delivered. This will help pupils and their families to establish what is appropriate and acceptable for them. Working in single-gender groups can considerably ease concerns about RSE, and help to ensure that pupils receive the RSE to which they are entitled. Single-gender groups can also help boys and girls to feel safer and less embarrassed about airing issues and discussing relationships. Where single-gender groups are used for pupils, they will always be given time after the sessions to come together in a controlled environment to share and discuss what they have learnt, before leaving the classroom.

Special educational needs and disabilities (SEND):

RSE helps all pupils understand their physical and emotional development and enable them to make positive decisions in their lives. We ensure that all pupils receive RSE and we offer provision appropriate to the particular needs of our pupils, taking specialist advice where necessary. Staff will differentiate lessons to ensure that all members of the class can access the information fully. The school will use a variety of different strategies to ensure that all pupils have access to the same information.

Some pupils will be more vulnerable to abuse and exploitation than their peers, and others may be confused about what is acceptable public behaviour. These pupils will need help to develop skills to reduce the risks of being abused and exploited, and to learn what sorts of behaviour are, and are not, acceptable.

Where a pupil is receiving SEN support, schools should talk to parents regularly to set clear outcomes and review progress towards them, discuss the activities and support that will help achieve them, and identify the responsibilities of the parent, the pupil and the school. Schools should meet parents at least three times each year.

These discussions can build confidence in the actions being taken by the school, but they can also strengthen the impact of SEN support by increasing parental engagement in the approaches and teaching strategies that are being used. Finally, they can provide essential information on the impact of SEN support outside the school and any changes in the pupil’s needs.

SEND Code of Practice: 0 – 25 years, 2014

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Plus (LGBT+):

We have a clear duty under the Equality Act 2010 to ensure that our teaching is accessible to all pupils, including those who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or + (LGBT+). Inclusive RSE will foster good relations between pupils, tackle all types of prejudice, including homophobia, and promote understanding and respect, enabling us to meet the requirements and live the intended spirit, of the Equality Act 2010.

We will deal sensitively and honestly with issues of sexual orientation and identity, answer appropriate questions and offer support. Pupils, whatever their developing sexuality or identity, need to feel that RSE is relevant to them. Teachers will never assume that all intimate relationships are between opposite sexes. Information will be inclusive and will include LGBT people in stories, scenarios and role-plays. We will ensure all pupils can explore topics from a different gender’s point of view, and a variety of activities, including practical tasks, discussions, group activities and competitions. We will also ensure that our teaching is sensitive and age-appropriate in approach and content.

Resources

We use primarily the Islington Primary Scheme of Work (See appendix for full scheme) and the resources recommended within it. We will focus on the needs of the pupils and our planned learning objectives.

We select carefully resources which meet these objectives. We evaluate carefully teacher resources, leaflets, online resources, children’s books and videos before using them (see checklist in appendix 4).

  1. Learning environment and additional non-negotiable ground rules

Staff are careful to ensure their personal beliefs and attitudes do not influence the teaching of RSE. To this end, ground rules have been agreed to provide a framework of common values within which to teach. There are clear parameters as to what will be taught in a whole-class setting, and what will be dealt with on an individual basis.

In addition to the ground rules used in PSHE, we will develop non-negotiable ground rules for lessons and discussions related to RSE. If pupils are to benefit fully from an RSE programme, they need to be confident speakers, good listeners and effective, sensitive communicators. When the needs of pupils are analysed, of overriding importance are two key areas: they need to feel safe and be safe. Additional, non-negotiable ground rules will help staff to create a safe and relaxed environment in which they do not feel embarrassed or anxious about unexpected questions or comments from the pupils. They also reduce the possibility of inappropriate behaviour and the disclosure of inappropriate personal information.

Our additional, non-negotiable ground rules will be in line with on-going and well established speaking, listening rules in class but will include:

  • Confidentiality: ‘what is said in the room, stays in the room’ except if anyone mentions something which could be harmful or put them at risk – then will have to pass the information on to help keep them safe
  • It’s not OK to ask personal questions of each other or the teacher but we can put questions in the box for later.
  • Don’t use names: if you want to ask about or share a personal story or experience, you can speak in the third person about ‘someone I know’, ‘a friend’, ‘a situation I’ve heard about/read about’
  • We will try to only ask questions related to what we are learning in the lesson.
  • We will use the anatomical terms for the sexual body parts.
  • It is ok to say pass / not join in.
  • We will listen to and respect different opinions, situations & backgrounds.
  • We will wait patiently to contribute
  • One person to speak at any one time

We will develop the ground rules through:

  • Ongoing practice of Coop values
  • Current speaking and listening routines in school
  • Application of current behaviour policy
  • Introduction/recap of ground rules before RSE session begins
  1. Assessment, recording and reporting in RSE

We assess pupils’ learning in RSE in line with approaches used in the rest of the curriculum (including assessment for learning). We report to parents/carers at the end of the school year on pupils’ learning and progress within RSE.

Assessment methods:

  • baseline or pre-assessment (essential for needs-led RSE) by use of knowledge grids formatively and I cans statements ensures prior knowledge is built on
  • needs-led assessment is used to identify existing knowledge and skills of pupils
  • assessment is built into the RSE programme to inform planning through low stakes quizzes
  • pupil self-assessment is used where appropriate
  • the assessment focuses on knowledge as well as skill development and attitudes thorough progress grids and I can stamen
  • all class teachers use subject learning journeys as formative assessment tools
  • identify pupils who have exceeded or fallen short of the module objectives and those that have achieved it
  • pupil progress and achievement is reported to parents/carers in the end of year report
  • pupil achievement in RSE is celebrated and shared
  • Monitoring and evaluation

Monitoring activities:

  • effective PSHE leadership with a system of quality judgments and peer support
  • regular review of the RSE policy and programme
  • pupil and staff interviews/questionnaires
  • pupil/staff/parent surveys (MYMSS)
  • scrutinising staff planning
  • samples of pupils’ work

Evaluation activities:

  • teacher and pupil evaluation of lessons, units and the overall RSE programme through MHMSS
  • evaluation of contributions of external partners
  • verbal feedback and evaluation by pupils
  • sampling of pupils’ work
  1. Safeguarding and Child Protection

Through Relationships Education (and RSE), we will teach pupils the knowledge they need to recognise and to report abuse, including emotional, physical and sexual abuse. This will be delivered by focusing on boundaries and privacy, ensuring young people understand that they have rights over their own bodies. This will also include understanding boundaries in friendships with peers and also in families and with others, in all contexts, including online.

Pupils will be taught how to report concerns and seek advice when they suspect or know that something is wrong. At all stages it will be important to balance teaching children about making sensible decisions to stay safe (including online) whilst being clear it is never the fault of a child who is abused and why victim-blaming is always wrong. These subjects complement Health Education and as part of a comprehensive programme and whole.

Children have the right to:

  • say no
  • respect their own body
  • speak out and know that someone can help

When teaching any sensitive issue young people may give cause for concern. All adults are aware of our safeguarding arrangements and procedures. If the school has any reason to believe a pupil is at risk, advice from Leeds Child Protection Team will be sought.

We recognise that children are capable of abusing their peers and that peer on peer abuse can manifest in many different ways, including on-line bullying, sharing inappropriate images, initiation/hazing (an activity expected of someone joining or participating in a group that humiliates, degrades, abuses or endangers them, regardless of a person’s willingness to participate) and inappropriate/harmful sexual behaviours.

Our use of the anatomical terms for body parts helps to ensure that children are able to describe abusive behaviours if they need to.

Ground rules at the start of sessions help to establish and maintain a safe learning environment; this is important for good learning to take place, and also contributes to effective safeguarding.

  1. Confidentiality in the context of RSE lessons

The nature of RSE means that pupils may disclose personal information that staff will respond to appropriately.  The classroom is never a confidential place to talk, and that remains true in RSE. Pupils will be reminded that lessons are not a place to discuss their personal experiences and issues or to ask others to do so, through the establishment of ground rules. Any visitor to the classroom will be bound by the school’s policy on confidentiality, regardless of whether they have, or their organisation has, a different policy. We will make sure visitors are aware of this, and make sure there are enough opportunities for pupils to access confidential support after the lesson if they need it.

Any information disclosed to a staff member or other responsible adult, which causes concern about the child’s safety, will be communicated to the designated person as soon as possible and always within 24 hours, in line with our safeguarding and child protection policy.

If a pupil tells a staff member something personal on a one-to-one basis outside of the classroom, our school’s confidentiality policy will help us to decide whether that person can keep that information confidential, or whether they need to seek help, advice, or refer to someone else. We will also signpost pupils and their families, where appropriate, to on and offline community, health and counselling services so pupils know where to go for confidential help and advice.

Techniques used in school to minimise the chance of pupils making a disclosure in an RSE lesson include:

  • depersonalising discussions
  • puppets
  • using role-play to ‘act out’ scenarios
  • appropriate DVDs and TV extracts
  • case studies/discussions with invented characters
  • using third person pronouns
  • visits to/from outside agencies
  1. Support

We hope that pupils will feel safe in the school environment to talk to any member of staff in confidence about any areas of concern regarding their personal, social or emotional development, including matters raised by, or relating to, RSE. We promote the school ethos as one of inclusion and acceptance throughout all areas of school activity and hope that pupils respond to this by feeling comfortable to ask questions and continue their learning both in and outside of the classroom.

If parents require support in providing effective RSE at home, they should contact the class teacher in the first instance. Alternatively, they can contact the PSHCE Lead / Headteacher on 0113 2 489539 or by email to brow-office@coopacademies.co.uk

Support for LGBT pupils

Our school environment is one of support and inclusion for all in line with our Cooperative values. We have a provision in place to support pupils identifying at LGBT through our dedicated LGBT mentors. These are Mrs Blanchfied, Mrs Emmet and Mr Scott-Haigh.

  1. Complaints

Parents/carers who have complaints or concerns regarding the RSE provision should contact the school and follow the school’s complaints policy.

  1. Liaison with local media

Please contact the press and media office on: 0113 378 6007

  1. Local support available to schools

The Health and Wellbeing Service can offer support through training, bespoke lessons and in school advisory sessions.

Further information on the above training, as well as how to book, can be found at: www.schoolwellbeing.co.uk and www.leedsforlearning.co.uk

  1. Local and national website.

Healthy relationships, sexual consent, exploitation and abuse:

Violence within relationships:

  • The Against Violence and Abuse Project provides further information, advice and guidance: avaproject.org.uk
  • Rape Crisis provides help and advice to those affected by rape, sexual violence and child sexual abuse: rapecrisis.org.uk
  • Providing support to people in the Leeds District whose lives have been affected by domestic violence and abuse: http://www.behind-closed-doors.org.uk/

Teaching about pornography:

Teaching about sexting:

Inclusive RSE:

  • Stonewall has produced a series of packs and information for schools. Details are available at: stonewall.org.uk
  • Brook has produced packs to help those who work with diverse groups of children, available at: brook.org.uk/shop including:

Local sources of support:

www.schoolwellbeing.co.uk

www.healthyschools.org.uk

www.leedsforlearning.co.uk

http://www.leeds.gov.uk/phrc/Pages/default.aspx

www.leeds.gov.uk/phrc/Pages/public-health-training.aspx

https://www.leedsscp.org.uk/Home

http://leedssexualhealth.com

http://www.themarketplaceleeds.org.uk/

http://mesmac.co.uk/

https://www.mindmate.org.uk/

National sources of support:

http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Sexualhealthtopics/Pages/Sexual-health-hub.aspx https://www.brook.org.uk/

http://www.fpa.org.uk/

http://www.sexeducationforum.org.uk/

https://www.pshe-association.org.uk/

http://www.stonewall.org.uk/

http://www.bodysense.org.uk/

www.riseabove.org.uk

http://www.nat.org.uk/

https://www.nspcc.org.uk/

https://www.childline.org.uk

APPENDIX 1a                          

Checklist for schools and agencies
TIME AND PLACE
Date(s) of Involvement: Time:

From                 to

Number of days/weeks:

Venue / room(s): Agency arrival time:
Room Layout: Agency to be greeted by:
Equipment required to be provided by the school: Session plans:

Attached: yes / no

To be forwarded to:

PEOPLE
School:

Contact details:

Agency name:

Specialism:

School address:

Tel No:

E-mail:

Agency address:

Tel No:

E-mail:

Child protection teacher:

Learning mentor / other contacts:

Agency contact:

Other Contact:

Teachers to be involved: Do parents/carers need to be consulted before the session?  yes / no
Have disclosure/confidentiality procedures been discussed?  yes / no

Other policies for consideration:

Is the school satisfied with the agencies DBS / liability arrangements?  yes / no
The number of pupils:

Key Stage:

Year Group:

Learning needs:

Other/individual needs:

Intended learning outcomes: What has been taught previously?

How will the work be continued?

How will skills and progress be assessed? Who will be present?

How will They support the session?

How does the work support the CPD of teachers e.g. team teaching? Do staff require/want any additional training?  yes / no
How will the effectiveness of the session be evaluated by pupils?

How will the effectiveness of the session be evaluated by adults?

Which routes for referral, procedures and services will pupils be signposted to?
AGREEMENTS
Have any expenses been agreed to?

yes / no

Checklist completed by:

Designation:

Date:

The meeting carried out:  in-person / by phone / other  (please circle)

APPENDIX 1b         Checklist

During & after the visit

Joint Evaluation Form

Please fill this in together where possible

Aim of session: Session date:

Time:

Agency:

School:

Year group:

Class:

Question Scale  1 – 10 How do you know?
1.  How well did the programme meet the needs of the pupils?
2.  How well has the work developed the skills of pupils to manage their wellbeing?
3.  How well has the input contributed to the RSE programme?
4.  Has there been an impact on staff skills and confidence?
5.  How well did the pre-planning support the session/visit?
6.  How will be the work be continued and/or adopted into the Schemes of Work next year?
7.                  Were there any elements that could be improved in the future?
8.                  Any other comments?
Please keep a copy for your records.

APPENDIX 2 (this is the letter we used form BigTalk last time) – asking them to contact the school if they can’t attend the parent session or have any concerns

Relationship Education to help keep children safer

Information for Parents & Carers of children in Primary Schools

In response to our changing society and the impact of the Internet, Government has now decided to introduce statutory Relationship Education to Primary Schools, these lessons are not new and have been delivered in good Primary Schools since the last guidance in 2000, however, some of the content has now been updated to help keep children safer.

School is here to help; we are engaging the support of the specialist organisation BigTalk Education, who are a Social Enterprise recognised by national leading bodies and government. They work with 3 to 18-year-olds and have been involved in delivering age-appropriate education of this type for over 20 years, they also deliver training for Professionals, Parents & Carers and will work with children at Brownhill on 8.01.2019

Below is some information on the Growing Up Safe programme that will be delivered to the Children by BigTalk Education, it reflects the Ofsted & SEF (the National Children’s Bureau’s Sex Education Forum) recommendations.

  • Age 3 Nursery A fun learning environment where the children are taught the differences between boys and girls, naming body parts, correct scientific words, private areas of the body, good touches and bad touches.
  • Ages 4 to 8 (Reception School Years 1, 2 & 3) Re-enforces and checks what was covered in Nursery. Using specially designed child-friendly resources at the end of this session they will be able to identify happy situations and those which may be risky (e.g. other children or adults taking improper photographs of them, inappropriate touches, exposure to unsuitable media etc.) plus who they can talk to if they are worried.
  • Ages 8 to 9 (School Year 4) We cover different kinds of families, similarities and differences between boys and girls, the emotional and physical changes of growing up (puberty) how babies are made, then develop in the womb etc. (reproduction). Looking after our bodies and how to be safe and healthy are also discussed.
  • Ages 9 to 11 (School Years 5 & 6) Reproduction and puberty are re-capped, the children are given the opportunity to ask questions. As well as additional questions on puberty, they will often want more details on how babies develop and are born. It is important that they know there is someone in school as well as at home if they want help, advice or more information etc. (Information at this stage is vital to protect them as they move onto Secondary School and to provide an alternative to Google etc.

All the resources BigTalk Education use are age-appropriate and help keep children protected from unwanted touches, abuse and exposure to unsuitable images etc. Research now shows that children receiving this type of education are three times more likely to speak out if they are touched inappropriately etc.

Please come along to the Parent Information Session on 8.01.2019 when a Facilitator from BigTalk Education will cover in greater detail what is included and the vital role Parents/Carers can play in keeping their children safe both now and as they progress into Secondary School. There will also be an opportunity to ask any questions as a small group or individually. Further information is also available on www.bigtalkeducation.co.uk/parents.

If you cannot attend the Parent Information Session and have any concerns regarding the above, please contact the school.

……………………..………………..……Tear off complete and return ……………………………………………

I will be attending the meeting for Parent/Carers on                                                            .

My Name                                                                                                                        .

Name(s) of child(ren)                                                                                                       .

Year Group(s)                                                                                                                  .

Our PSHE & RSE Programme in Year … / Key Stage This is the standard letter from the H&WBT

Dear …….,

We believe that promoting the health and well-being of our pupils is an important part of their overall education. We do this through our Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) course. This looks at many topics including all kinds of relationships, physical / emotional health and living in the wider world. The aim of the PSHE course is to help our pupils make safe and informed decisions during their school years and beyond.

Sex and Relationship Education (RSE) is an important part of the PSHE course. We will be teaching lessons about RSE in the …. term which will include topics such as  (puberty; relationships and communication skills; Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE); Female Genital Mutilation (FGM); body image; sexting and social media; domestic violence, consent.) During the course, pupils will be able to ask questions, which will be answered factually and in an age-appropriate manner. Each pupil’s privacy will be respected, and no one will be asked to reveal personal information.

Some parts of RSE are compulsory – these are part of the National Curriculum for Science. Parents can withdraw their children from all other parts of RSE if they wish to do so. However, we believe that the presentation of sexual images in social and other media make it important that all young people have a place to discuss pressures, check facts and dispel myths. Even if a child is withdrawn, many pupils will discuss such issues with each other outside the classroom – so, rather than hear about the content second-hand, we hope all children will have the opportunity to take part in our carefully planned lessons.

Many parents and parent-related organisations support good quality RSE in school. Parents are the most important educators of young people in personal issues and many welcome the support that school can offer to supplement their home teaching.

You may find that your child starts asking questions about the topic at home, or you might want to take the opportunity to talk to your child about issues before the work is covered in school. If you have any queries about the content of the programme or resources used, please do not hesitate in contacting me at school. All materials used are available for you to browse through should you so wish.

Yours sincerely,

………………………….

Appendix 3: Parent form: Big Talk opt-out letter to parents to go here

Appendix 4 Parent information leaflet from the government

Coop Academy Brownhill takes its responsibility to provide relevant, effective and responsible RSE to all of its pupils as part of the school’s personal, social, health, economic (PSHE) education curriculum very seriously. The school wants parents/carers and pupils to feel assured that RSE will be delivered at a level appropriate to both the age and development of pupils, and safe to voice opinions and concerns relating to the RSE provision.

  1. Context – why RSE is important

We are required to teach Relationships Education and health Education as part of our PSHE curriculum. Current regulations and guidance from the Department for Education (DfE) state that from September 2020, all schools must deliver Relationships Education and Health Education. High quality Relationships Education, Health Education and RSE help create a safe school community in which our pupils can grow, learn and develop positive, healthy behaviour for life.

It is essential for the following reasons:

  • RSE plays a vital part in meeting the schools’ safeguarding obligations as outlined in the updated Keeping children safe in education – Statutory guidance for schools and colleges (September 2019) .
  • The DfE 2019 statutory guidance states that, from September 2020, all schools providing primary education, including all-through schools and middle schools must teach Relationships Education.
  • Children have a right to good quality education, as set out in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.
  • Children want to be prepared for the physical and emotional changes they undergo at puberty, and young people want to learn about relationships. Older pupils frequently say that Relationships and Sex Education was ‘too little, too late and too biological’. Ofsted reinforced this in their 2013 ‘Not Yet Good Enough report.’
  • Ofsted is clear that schools must have a preventative programme that enables pupils to learn about safety and risks in relationships.
  • National Curriculum: RSE plays an important part in fulfilling the statutory duties the school has to meet as section 2 of the National Curriculum framework (DfE, 2013) states
  • The Department of Health set out its ambition for all children to receive high quality Relationships and Sex Education in the Sexual Health Improvement Framework (2013), while the Department for Education’s paper, The Importance of Teaching (2010) highlighted that ‘Children need high quality Relationships and Sex Education so they can make wise and informed choices’ (p.46).
  • These duties are set out in the 2002 Education Act and the 2010 Academies Act. Whole school (Section 5) Ofsted inspections consider the extent to which a school provides such a curriculum.
  • Schools maintain a statutory obligation under the Children Act (2004) to promote their pupils’ emotional wellbeing, and improving their ability to achieve in school and under the Education Act (1996) to prepare children for the challenges, opportunities and responsibilities of adult life. A comprehensive RSE programme can have a positive impact on pupils’ health and wellbeing and their ability to achieve, and can play a crucial part in meeting these obligations.

 

  1. Development process

This policy was produced by Beverly Blanchfield (Headteacher), Nick Davenport (PSHCE Lead) in conjunction with the Leeds Health & Well Being Team

From September 2020, the law requires primary schools to consult on their Relationships Education policy. Any primary school choosing to teach Sex Education – which is recommended by the Department for Education but not required by the law – must have a policy on this as well and should consult parents on it.

Consultation must be carried out when the policy is formed and subsequently whenever it is updated. The Department for Education recommends that schools engage with parents on these policies on a regular basis, as the parent body does not remain static and the programme may need to be adapted to meet new needs and ensure continuous improvement. Schools will want to consider this and develop an approach that is proportionate to their needs.

Parents/carers were consulted through the school website, a survey in parent mail and through the weekly newsletter.  Further, parents are consulted annually and all resources and vocabulary is shared at a parents RSE consultation run by BigTalk education RSE providers. Teaching and non-teaching staff were consulted through staff meeting and CPD /training, and pupils were consulted through the student council. Governors were consulted through discussion of draft policy at initial and subsequent governors meetings. This policy has been approved and adopted by the head teacher and governing body. The member of staff responsible for overseeing and reviewing this policy is: Nick Davenport (PSHCE Lead) It will be reviewed briefly annually and in full every 2 – 3 years.

We are committed to the ongoing development of RSE in our school. We will use the following indicators to monitor and evaluate progress:

  • a coordinated and consistent approach to curriculum delivery has been adopted,
  • the content of the RSE curriculum is flexible and responsive to pupils’ differing needs e.g. through the use of pupil perception data such as the My Health My School Survey
  • children are receiving an entitlement curriculum for Relationships Education in line with DfE national statutory guidance and local guidance
  • children are receiving an entitlement curriculum for Sex Education in line with national and local guidance
  • there are clearly identified learning objectives for all RSE activities and pupils’ learning is assessed using small stakes quizzes against the knowledge mats for PSHCE (formative assessment) but also summative by assessing against to the ‘I can’ statements in reports.
  • opportunities for cross-curricular approaches are being used where appropriate
  • policy and practice is revised regularly and involves staff, governors, parents/carers and pupils
  • opportunities are provided for parents/carers and members of our community to consider the purpose and nature of our RSE, for example, through parent/carer information sessions/workshops from third party visitors
  • a variety of methods are employed to communicate the key points of the policy and curriculum to the community e.g. through the school website / newsletter
  1. Location and dissemination

 

This policy document is freely available on request to the whole school community. The policy is referred to in the school prospectus as well as in relevant areas of the curriculum. A copy of the policy can be found on the school website. A physical copy of the policy is available free of charge from the school office.

 

  1. Relationship to other policies

 

This policy supports/complements the following policies:

  • Attendance (in particular in relation to FGM)
  • Behaviour
  • Child Protection/Safeguarding Children (including FGM)
  • Equal Opportunities
  • E-safety/IT
  • First Aid
  • Health & Safety
  • Science
  • SEN/Inclusion
  • Teaching and Learning

Documents that inform the school’s RSE Policy include:

  • Education Act (1996)
  • Learning and Skills Act (2000)
  • Education and Inspections Act (2006)
  • Equality Act (2010)
  • Supplementary Guidance SRE for the 21st Century (2014)
  • Children and Social Work Act (2017)
  • DfE: Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) and Health Education: Statutory guidance for governing bodies, proprietors, head teachers, principals, senior leadership teams, teachers (2019)
  • Keeping children safe in education – statutory safeguarding guidance (2020)
  • United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child

 

  1. Definition

Relationships and Sex Education is learning about the emotional, social and physical aspects of growing up, relationships, sex, human sexuality and sexual health. Some aspects are taught in science, and others are taught as part of personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE).

A comprehensive programme of RSE provides accurate information about the body, reproduction, sex, and sexual health. It also gives children and young people essential skills for building positive, enjoyable, respectful and non-exploitative relationships and staying safe both on and offline.

 

  1. The principles of high quality RSE in our school

Relationships and Sex Education:

  • is a partnership between home and school
  • ensures pupils’ views are actively sought to influence lesson planning and teaching
  • starts early and is relevant to pupils at each stage in their development and maturity
  • is taught by people who are trained and confident in talking about issues such as healthy and unhealthy relationships, equality, pleasure, respect, abuse, sexuality, gender identity, sex and consent
  • includes the acquisition of knowledge, the development of life skills and respectful attitudes and values
  • has sufficient time to cover a wide range of topics, with a strong emphasis on relationships, consent, rights, responsibilities to others, negotiation and communication skills, and accessing services
  • helps pupils understand on and offline safety, consent, violence and exploitation
  • is both medically and factually correct and treats sex as a normal and pleasurable fact of life
  • is inclusive of difference: gender identity, sexual orientation, special educational needs and disability, ethnicity, culture, age, faith or belief, or other life experience
  • uses active learning methods, and is rigorously planned, assessed and evaluated
  • helps pupils understand a range of views and beliefs about relationships and sex in society which may differ to their own
  • teaches pupils about the law and their rights to confidentiality even if they are under 16
  • promotes equality in relationships, recognises and challenges gender inequality and reflects girls’ and boys’ different experiences and needs
  1. Overall school aims for RSE

 

Our approach to RSE consists of a comprehensive and developmental programme of teaching and learning, which is delivered in the context of a Healthy School where the health and wellbeing of pupils and the whole school community are actively promoted. Our RSE programme has a positive influence on the ethos, learning and relationships throughout the school. It is central to our values and to achieving our school’s stated aims and objectives. Our RSE programme helps pupils to develop the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes they need to live confident, healthy, independent lives now and in the future.

Through the provision outlined in this policy, the school’s overall aims of RSE are to teach and develop the following main elements:

Attitudes and values:

  • Links effectively with our school’s cooperative values
  • learn the importance of individual conscience and moral considerations
  • learn the value of family life, marriage, and stable and loving relationships for the nurture of children
  • learn the value of respect, love and care
  • explore, consider and understand moral dilemmas
  • develop critical thinking as part of decision-making

Personal and social skills:

  • Links effectively with our school’s cooperative values
  • learn to manage emotions and relationships confidently and sensitively
  • develop self-respect and empathy for others
  • learn to make choices based on an understanding of difference and with an absence of prejudice
  • develop an appreciation of the consequences of choices made
  • manage conflict
  • learn how to recognise and avoid exploitation and abuse

Knowledge and understanding:

  • learn and understand physical development at appropriate stages
  • understand human sexuality, reproduction, sexual health, emotions and relationships
  • learn about contraception and the range of local and national sexual health advice, contraception and support services
  • learn the reasons for delaying sexual activity, and the benefits to be gained from such delay, including the avoidance of unplanned pregnancy

In addition to this, we also aim to:

  • raise pupils’ self-esteem and confidence
  • develop communication and assertiveness skills that can help them stay true to their values if challenged by others, their peers or what they see in the media
  • teach pupils to be accepting of the different beliefs, cultures, religions, sexual orientations, gender identity, physical and mental abilities, backgrounds and values of those around them
  • support pupils to lead a healthy and safe lifestyle, teaching them to care for, and respect, their bodies
  • provide pupils with the right tools to enable them to seek information or support, should they need it
  • teach pupils about consent and their right to say no, in an age appropriate manner
  • to teach lessons that are sensitive to a range of views, values and beliefs
  • ensure that staff teaching RSE remain neutral in their delivery whilst ensuring that pupils always have access to the learning they need to stay safe, healthy and understand their rights as individuals

The aim of RSE is NOT to:

  • To encourage pupils to become sexually active at a young age
  • promote a particular sexual orientation or gender identity
  • sexualise children

 

RSE does not sexualise children; it is part of the solution to concerns about sexualisation. The evidence that good quality RSE delays sexual activity can be summarised here: https://www.ncb.org.uk/sites/default/files/uploads/documents/Blog_reports/sef_doesRSEwork_2010.pdf

 

  1. The wider context of RSE

 

The school’s RSE programme will:

  • be an integral part of the lifelong learning process, beginning in early childhood and continuing into adult life
  • be an entitlement for all pupils, including those with additional learning and language needs
  • be set within the wider school context and support family commitment and love, respect and affection, knowledge and openness
  • recognise that family is a broad concept; not just one model, e.g. nuclear family
  • encourage pupils and teachers to share and respect each other’s views with cultural awareness and sensitivity
  • ensure pupils are aware of different approaches to sexual orientation, without promotion of any particular family structure
  • recognise that parents/carers are the key people in teaching their children about relationships, sex and growing up
  • work in partnership with parents/carers and pupils, consulting them about the content of the programme
  • work in partnership with other health professionals, specialist visitors to school and the wider community

RSE contributes to:

  • a positive ethos and environment for learning
  • safeguarding pupils (Children Act 2004), promoting their emotional wellbeing, and improving their ability
  • to achieve in school
  • a better understanding of diversity and inclusion, a reduction in gender-based and homophobic, bi-phobic, transphobic (HBT) prejudice, bullying and violence and an understanding of the difference between consenting and exploitative relationships
  • helping pupils keep themselves safe from harm, both on and offline, enjoy their relationships and build confidence in accessing services if they need help and advice
  • reducing early sexual activity, teenage conceptions, sexually transmitted infections, sexual exploitation and abuse, domestic violence and bullying.

 

 

  1. Key rights and responsibilities for Relationships and Sex Education

The policy applies to:

  • The head teacher
  • All school staff
  • The governing body
  • Pupils
  • Parents/carers
  • health professionals
  • Specialist partner agencies working in or with the school

 

The headteacher is responsible for ensuring that RSE is taught consistently across the school, and for managing requests to withdraw pupils from non-statutory components of RSE (see appendix 3)

Specific responsibilities

 

Who – role?

E.g. PSHE lead, head teacher, CP designated teacher

Co-ordinating the RSE provision, ensuring a spiral curriculum PSHCE Lead
Accessing and co-ordinating training and support for staff PSHCE Lead / Headteacher
Establishing and maintaining links with external agencies/other health professionals  PSHCE Lead / Head, CP lead
Policy development and review, including consultation and dissemination Headteacher / PSHCE Lead
Implementation of the policy; monitoring and assessing its effectiveness in practice PSHCE Lead / Headteacher
Link governor for RSE ?
Managing child protection/safe guarding issues CP Lead / Headteacher
Establishing and maintaining links with parents/carers CP Lead / Learning Mentor / Headteacher / All staff
Liaising with link schools to ensure a smooth transition Y6 Staff
Liaising with the media Headteacher
  1. Language

 

Pupils will be taught the anatomical terms for body parts. Slang or everyday terms used in certain social circles will be discussed; this will surround discussion about what is and isn’t acceptable language to use. This will be shared with parents/carers before it is delivered in class through a parental drop in session from specialist RSE company ‘BigTalk’ education.

Agreed list of vocabulary used in school:

Vocabulary (list of examples but not exhaustive):
  Will be used

The words and phrases below will be used by adults and children in the teaching and learning process.

May arise

We do not plan to teach but it but language may arise e.g. to re-visit some learning, to clarify or re-teach some aspects.

Reception Family, friends, Trusted Adult, private areas, mouth, chest, penis, vagina, bottom, Gay (Men who love men) Lesbian. (Women who love women)

Washing ourselves, secrets v. surprises, programmes that are just for adults

Year 1 Family, friends, Trusted Adult, private areas, mouth, chest, penis, vagina, bottom, Gay (Men who love men) Lesbian. (Women who love women)

Washing ourselves, secrets v. surprises, programmes that are just for adults

Names of current popular Internet games.
Year 2 As above plus, some people feel different on the inside to the outside, gender. Biological difference between boys and girls: vagina, penis, breasts, testicles, clitoris.  People we don’t know on the Internet. Selfies. Appropriate & inappropriate photos, websites, programmes etc. Dares, Age ratings on social media, films, games etc.
Year 3 As above, homosexual, bi-sexual, gender roles, homophobia
Year 4 As above plus, families, step-families, fostering, adoption, marriage.

Our bodies, including puberty changes, mood swings, hormones, emotions, body hair, periods,  menstruation, erections, nocturnal emissions, wet dreams, ejaculations, foreskin, infection, testosterone, oestrogen, pads, Genitals, bladder, anus, urethra, testicles, penis, vagina, Sperm, ovum, clitoris,  uterus, womb, sex, making love, conception, Love, Relationship, Family, Supportive, Caring, Loving, Consent, Labour, birth, cervix, natural birth, caesarean,

Transgender, Transphobic, Biphobic, Homophobia, Transphobia, Biphobia, LGBT+
Year 5 As above, with more time for questions and clarification.

Homosexual, Heterosexual, Transgender, Bisexual, Homophobic, Transphobic, Biphobic, Homophobia, Transphobia, Biphobia, LGBT+ gender stereotyping

Questions regarding sex and the Law.
Year 6 As above, with more time for questions and clarification. Contraception, STD’s / HIV Questions on same sex parents

We will alert parents as to when anatomical terms are likely to be used in class. However, we might need to use the terms at other times, such as when dealing with incidents of misuse or disrespectful language and at later point in the year for consolidation, follow up work and as part of our existing Scheme of Work.

We will consider how pupils who are new to English will be supported in accessing and understanding the language used in RSE lessons. E.g. Pre teach vocab, the use of images, repetition, simplified terms and a translation dictionary.

Respectful Language

The use of respectful language which challenges sexism, homophobia and other forms of prejudice will be established in RSE but will have benefits for the whole school community, both in and out of lessons; it helps to ensure we are a happy and healthy place to learn. Ofsted found that casual use of homophobic language in schools is often unchallenged (2013) – we always challenge it. The casual use of homophobic, biphobic and transphobic language in school will be challenged and pupils will be made aware that using the word ‘gay’ to mean something is rubbish is wrong and will not be tolerated. To tackle this, staff might say: ‘you’ve used the word ‘gay’, but not in the right way.’

As a result, pupils will hear references to, for example, ‘gay,’ ‘straight’ and different kinds of relationships as part of teaching and assemblies, for example when we talk about rights, respect or relationships.

 

  1. Answering questions

 

In order to promote a healthy, positive atmosphere for RSE school want to ensure that pupils can ask questions freely, confident that they will be answered, and be sure that they will be free from bullying or harassment from other pupils. We believe that children are best educated, protected from harm and exploitation by discussing issues openly within the context of the RSE programme.

We acknowledge that potentially sensitive or controversial issues will arise as pupils will naturally share information and ask questions. ‘They will often ask their teachers or other adults questions pertaining to sex or sexuality which go beyond what’s set of for Relationships Education. We also acknowledge that children of the same age may be developmentally at different stages leading to differing types of questions or behaviours.’

When spontaneous discussions arise, it is guided in a way that reflects the stated school aims and curriculum content for RSE. As a first principle, we answer questions relating to taught, planned curriculum for that age group to the whole class. We answer questions, where appropriate, relating to areas beyond the taught, planned curriculum for that age group, in a sensitive and age appropriate way, only to the pupil or pupils who have asked the question. If a member of staff is uncertain about the answer to a question, or indeed whether they should answer it, they will seek guidance from the Headteacher/ RSE leader/ Child Protection Officer. Questions may be referred to parents/carers if it is not appropriate to answer them in school. We will also use a question box where questions may be asked anonymously.

When answering questions, we ensure that sharing personal information by adults, pupils or their families is discouraged. Where a question or comment from a pupil in the classroom indicates the possibilities of abuse or risk of harm, teachers will pass this information to the designated person for safeguarding and child protection, in line with school policy and procedures.

Teaching staff will be familiar with the content and resources of BigTalk Education’s ‘Growing up Safe’ programme through shadow training, therefore should be equipped to answer questions resulting from the GUS sessions or during delivery of the schools RSE curriculum. Should questions of concern arise that teaching staff are uncertain how to answer, support can be sought from the Headteacher / PSHE Coordinator or BigTalk Education in order to give an age appropriate answer.

Staff training sessions on how to deal with difficult questions will be arranged for staff that are un-confident. Agreed phrases, where appropriate, will be used in response to difficult questions. Phrases we will use are: ‘Can you put write that down and put it in the question box, I will answer it later’ ‘I can only answer questions on the content of this lesson’ or ‘That is something that may be covered later on.’

 

Ground rules are essential when discussing sensitive subject matters. Staff will establish clear parameters about what is appropriate and inappropriate in a whole-class setting by for example:

  • staff will set the tone by speaking in a matter-of-fact way
  • pupils will be encouraged to write down questions, anonymously if desired, and post them in a question box or ask-it basket
  • staff will have time to prepare answers to all questions before the next session, and will choose not to respond in a whole-class setting to any questions that are inappropriate or need one-to-one follow up
  • if a verbal question is too personal, staff will remind the pupils of the ground rules
  • if a question is too explicit, feels too old for a pupil, is inappropriate for the whole class, or raises concerns, staff will acknowledge it and promise to attend to it later on an individual basis
  • staff will not provide more information than is appropriate to the age/developmental level of the pupil
  • if staff are concerned that a pupil is at risk of abuse, the designated teacher will be informed and the usual child protection procedures followed

.

  1. Key responsibilities for RSE

 

  1. All staff

 

All staff will:

  • ensure that they are up to date with school policy and curriculum requirements regarding RSE
  • attend and engage in professional development training around RSE provision, including individual and whole staff training/inset, where appropriate
  • attend staff meetings to be introduced to any new areas of work and review the effectiveness of the approaches used
  • report back to the RSE Coordinator on any areas that they feel are not covered or inadequately provided for in the school’s RSE provision
  • encourage pupils to communicate concerns regarding their social, personal and emotional development in confidence and listen to their needs and support them
  • follow the school’s reporting systems if a pupil comes to a member of staff with an issue that they feel they are not able to deal with alone
  • ensure that their personal beliefs and attitudes will not prevent them from providing balanced RSE in school
  • tailor their lessons to suit all pupils in their class, across the whole range of abilities, faiths, beliefs, culture, gender identity and sexual orientations, including SEND
  • ask for support in this from the school SEND coordinator or the RSE Coordinator, should they need it
  1. Lead member/s of staff

The lead member/s of staff will receive training in their role and responsibilities. This supports them to lead on the development of the school’s policy and practice and to monitor its implementation. This practice includes the curriculum and approaches to teaching and learning, as well as whole school approaches to health and wellbeing.

The lead member/s of staff will:

  • develop the school policy and review it on a yearly basis
  • ensure all members of the governing body are clear about the RSE curriculum
  • ensure that all staff are given regular and ongoing training on issues relating to RSE as well as how to deliver lessons on such issues
  • ensure that all staff are up to date with policy changes, and familiar with school policy and guidance relating to RSE, including new staff or supply staff
  • provide support and appropriate training to staff members who feel uncomfortable or ill-equipped to deal with the delivery of RSE to pupils
  • ensure that RSE is a spiral curriculum, age appropriate and needs-led across all year groups; this means ensuring that the curriculum develops as the pupils do and meets their needs
  • ensure that the knowledge and information regarding RSE to which all pupils are entitled is provided in a comprehensive way
  • support parent/carer involvement in the development of the RSE curriculum
  • ensure that their personal beliefs, values and attitudes will not prevent them from providing balanced RSE in school
  • communicate freely with staff, parents/carers and the governing body to ensure that everyone is in understanding of the school policy and curriculum for RSE, and that any concerns or opinions regarding the provision at the school are listened to, taken into account and acted on as appropriate
  • share the school’s provision for RSE with parents/carers in order to ensure they can support this at home
  • communicate to parents/carers any additional support that is available from the school to support them with RSE at home

 

  • Governors

The governing body as a whole plays an active role in monitoring, developing and reviewing the policy and its implementation in school. The named link governor for RSE is (………………………….) who works closely with, and in support of, the lead member/s of staff. When aspects of RSE appear in the School Improvement Plan, a governor will be assigned to reflect on, monitor and review the work as appropriate.

As well as fulfilling their legal obligations, the governing body will also make sure that:

  • all pupils make progress in achieving the expected educational outcomes
  • the subjects are well led, effectively managed and well planned
  • the quality of provision is subject to regular and effective self-evaluation
  • teaching is delivered in ways that are accessible to all pupils with SEND
  • clear information is provided for parents on the subject content and the right to request that their child is withdrawn from appropriate areas
  • the subjects are resourced, staffed and timetabled in a way that ensures that the school can fulfil its legal obligations

 

  1. Pupils

All pupils:

  • are expected to attend the statutory National Curriculum Science elements of the RSE curriculum and the statutory Relationships Education and Health Education curriculum
  • should support one another with issues that arise through RSE by, for example, alerting relevant members of staff to any potential worries or issues
  • will listen in class, be considerate of other people’s feelings and beliefs and comply with the ground rules that are set in class
  • will have the opportunity to talk to a member of staff, in confidence, regarding any concerns they have in school related to RSE or otherwise
  • will be asked for feedback on the school’s RSE provision through the annual MyHealthMySchool survey and be expected to take this responsibility seriously; opinions on provision and comments will be reviewed by the lead member of staff for RSE and taken into consideration when the curriculum is prepared for the following year’s pupils

 

  1. Parents/carers

 

The role of parents in the development of their children’s understanding about relationships is vital. Parents are the first teachers of their children. They have the most significant influence in enabling their children to grow and mature and to form healthy relationships.

The school will:

  • ensure that parents/carers know what will be taught and when, and clearly communicate the fact that parents have the right to request that their child be withdrawn from some or all of sex education delivered as part of RSE
  • give parents/carers every opportunity to understand the purpose and content of Relationships Education and RSE through parent information sessions
  • communicate and give opportunities for parents/carers to understand and ask questions about the school’s approach help increase confidence in the curriculum
  • build a good relationship with parents/carers on these subjects over time by inviting parents into school to discuss what will be taught, address any concerns and help support them in managing conversations with their children on these issues
  • encourage parents/carers to create an open home environment where pupils can engage, discuss and continue to learn about matters that have been raised through RSE
  • will reach out to all parents, including those who are hard to engage, recognising that a range of approaches may be needed for doing so

 

The right to withdraw

 

Parents/carers cannot withdraw their child from the statutory sex education content included in National Curriculum for Science which includes content on human development, including reproduction. Parents/carers also cannot withdraw their child from Relationships Education or Health Education because it is important that all children receive this content, covering topics such as friendships, how to stay safe and puberty. However, they do have the right to request that their child be withdrawn from some or all of sex education delivered as part of the non-statutory RSE, delivered as part of the PSHE curriculum.

Requests for withdrawal should be put in writing using and addressed to the headteacher. Before granting any such the head teacher will discuss this request with parents/carers and, as appropriate, with the child to ensure that their wishes are understood and to clarify the nature and purpose of the curriculum. This process will be documented to ensure a record is kept

The head teacher and, preceding their annual visit, specialist providers from ‘BigTalk’ RSE education will also discuss with parents/carers the benefits of receiving this important education and any detrimental effects that withdrawal might have on the child. This will include any social and emotional effects of being excluded, as well as the likelihood of the child hearing their peers’ version of what was said in the classes, rather than what was directly said by the teacher. Children will no doubt hear about the content of sessions from other pupils and this may not be in a supportive, controlled or safe environment. They may also seek out their own information via the internet, which may result in them finding out incorrect information and possibly put them in an unsafe situation.  Pupils may also be stigmatised for not being included in these sessions.

RSE is a vital part of the school curriculum and supports child development and we strongly advise parents/carers to carefully consider their decision before withdrawing their child from this aspect of school life. It is acknowledged however that the final decision on the issue is for the parents/carers to take and the child and family should not be stigmatised for the decision.

The school provides an annual ‘drop in’ session to share resources and answer any question and this is coordinated between the school and the RSE specialist provider ‘BigTalk.’  Termly curriculum newsletters, weekly newsletters and the school website can give further information on understanding Relationships Education. Support materials for home use will also be offered.

 

  1. Staff Support & CPD

It is important that all staff feel comfortable to deliver RSE lessons. The school provides regular professional development training in how to deliver RSE in light of the new statutory objectives.  Staff, including non-teaching staff, CPD needs are identified and met through the following ways:

 

  • an audit of staff CPD needs will be completed each year or at appropriate times throughout the year by the PSHCE lead
  • training and support is organised by the PSHCE lead / Headteacher
  • staff will be offered generic RSE training which includes sessions on confidentiality, creating ground rules, handling controversial issues, responding to awkward questions , an introduction to the rationale of why teaching RSE is so important, current law and guidance, learning outcomes and school policy.
  • staff involved in the delivery of issues seen as potentially more sensitive will be offered appropriate training to encourage confidence in dealing with matters of confidentiality, child protection, sensitive issues and potentially difficult questions
  • External providers such as BigTalk education and the Health and Well Being Team may support in meeting staff training needs.

 

  1. RSE Provision

 

Statutory aspects of Sex Education within the National Curriculum Science

 

All schools must teach the following as part of the National Curriculum Science; parents/carers do not have the right to withdraw their child/children from this.

National Curriculum Science:

Key Stage 1:

●        identify, name, draw and label the basic parts of the human body and say which part of the body is associated with each sense

●        notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults

●        describe the importance for humans of hygiene

Key Stage 2:

●        describe the differences in the life cycles of a mammal, an amphibian, an insect and a bird

●        describe the life process of reproduction in some plants and animals

●        describe the changes as humans develop to old age

Statutory aspects of Relationships Education: (taught through use of You, Me & PSHCE Scheme)

Families and people who care for me ●        that families are important for children growing up because they can give love, security and stability.

●        the characteristics of healthy family life, commitment to each other, including in times of difficulty, protection and care for children and other family members, the importance of spending time together and sharing each other’s lives.

●        that others’ families, either in school or in the wider world, sometimes look different from their family, but that they should respect those differences and know that other children’s families are also characterised by love and care.

Caring friendships ●        how important friendships are in making us feel happy and secure, and how people choose and make friends.

●        the characteristics of friendships, including mutual respect, truthfulness, trustworthiness, loyalty, kindness, generosity, trust, sharing interests and experiences and support with problems and difficulties.

●        that healthy friendships are positive and welcoming towards others, and do not make others feel lonely or excluded.

●        that most friendships have ups and downs, and that these can often be worked through so that the friendship is repaired or even strengthened, and that resorting to violence is never right.

●        how to recognise who to trust and who not to trust, how to judge when a friendship is making them feel unhappy or uncomfortable, managing conflict, how to manage these situations and how to seek help or advice from others, if needed.

Respectful relationships ●        the importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them (for example, physically, in character, personality or backgrounds), or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs.

●        practical steps they can take in a range of different contexts to improve or support respectful relationships.

●        the conventions of courtesy and manners.

●        the importance of self-respect and how this links to their own happiness.

●        that in school and in wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due respect to others, including those in positions of authority.

●        about different types of bullying (including cyberbullying), the impact of bullying, responsibilities of bystanders (primarily reporting bullying to an adult) and how to get help.

●        what a stereotype is, and how stereotypes can be unfair, negative or destructive.

●        the importance of permission-seeking and giving in relationships with friends, peers and adults.

Online relationships ●        that people sometimes behave differently online, including by pretending to be someone they are not.

●        that the same principles apply to online relationships as to face-to-face relationships, including the importance of respect for others online including when we are anonymous.

●        the rules and principles for keeping safe online, how to recognise risks, harmful content and contact, and how to report them.

●        how to critically consider their online friendships and sources of information including awareness of the risks associated with people they have never met.

●        how information and data is shared and used online.

Being safe ●        what sorts of boundaries are appropriate in friendships with peers and others (including in a digital context).

●        about the concept of privacy and the implications of it for both children and adults; including that it is not always right to keep secrets if they relate to being safe.

●        that each person’s body belongs to them, and the differences between appropriate and inappropriate or unsafe physical, and other, contact.

●        how to respond safely and appropriately to adults they may encounter (in all contexts, including online) whom they do not know.

●        how to recognise and report feelings of being unsafe or feeling bad about any adult.

●        how to ask for advice or help for themselves or others, and to keep trying until they are heard.

●        how to report concerns or abuse, and the vocabulary and confidence needed to do so.

●        where to get advice e.g. family, school and/or other sources.

 

Statutory aspects of Health Education (which apply to RSE)

 

Health and prevention ●        about personal hygiene and germs including bacteria, viruses, how they are spread and treated, and the importance of handwashing.

 

Changing adolescent body ●        key facts about puberty and the changing adolescent body, particularly from age 9 through to age 11, including physical and emotional changes.

●        about menstrual wellbeing including the key facts about the menstrual cycle.

 

Non-statutory Sex Education programme beyond the National Curriculum Science

 

Parents/carers do have the right to withdraw their child/children from this.

 

Human Reproduction:

  • About the structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems,
  • that women have ovum and men produce sperm, when these combine a baby can be made, this is called ‘sex’,
  • information on human gestation and birth.
  • Details on conception (how a baby is made) and the functional act of making love
  • how babies develop (including twins) and are born.

 

The needs of pupils

We recognise that an interactive approach to RSE will better develop the skills of our pupils and also that it is more likely to meet their needs. Through the school council, we involve pupils in the planning, development and evaluation of their RSE in ways appropriate to their age, stage and development.

 

We will involve pupils through:

  • discussions with small groups of pupils during pupil interviews
  • questionnaires/surveys (e.g. the My Health My School Survey)
  • pre and post assessment activities for RSE
  • school council meetings which ensure all pupils have a voice in the process

 

Topics to be covered

 

RSE needs to start early so that children learn about different kinds of relationships like families and friendships and so they can recognise if other people make them feel uncomfortable or unsafe. Lots of children start puberty before they leave primary school so it is important that all pupils know what to expect before it happens. We ensure RSE is taught in every year through ‘BigTalk’ education and also in Years 2, 4, 5 and 6 through the Islington Council spiral scheme of work. This helps pupils to learn progressively as they mature and revisit the subject on a regular basis, to reinforce learning and provide opportunities to ask further questions.

The Relationships Education, Health education and RSE curriculum we follow within PSHE is shown in Appendix 4a

Delivery of RSE

 

Pupils receive their entitlement for RSE through a spiral curriculum, in timetabled slots, which demonstrates progression. The RSE programme is delivered through a variety of opportunities including:

  • designated RSE time
  • use of external agencies/services
  • Coop ethos / learning hats / STARS
  • small group work and anecdotal / ad-hoc gap- filling activities
  • cross curricular links e.g. science, history, RE
  • assemblies
  • enrichment days / theatre performances

 

Working with visitors and other external agencies

Where appropriate, we may use visitors from external agencies or members of the community to support RSE. Working with external organisations enhances delivery of RSE, bringing in specialist knowledge, which gives different ways of engaging with our pupils.

Our school works with BigTalk Education; an award-winning team of specialist RSE facilitators led by Lynnette Smith, who is the Chair of the Sex Education Forum’s Advisory Group (the SEF is part of the National Children’s Bureau). BigTalk Education’s Growing Up Safe: Whole School Approach (GUS programme) has been recognised by the Family Planning Association and Children and Young People Now Awards as a Finalist in their Safeguarding Award. The BigTalk team deliver to each class within school. (See appendix 4 for the curriculum that will be used). It is a spiral curriculum therefore pupils will see the same topics throughout their school career, with each encounter increasing in complexity and reinforcing previous learning. Consequently, the topics included for Nursery and KS1 are included right the way up until year 6. Teaching staff observe the BigTalk Education RSE lessons as part of their CPD programme to ensure they can reinforce the lesson content and answer any follow up questions throughout the academic year.

We will ensure that the teaching delivered by the visitor fits with our planned programme and policy. We will discuss the detail of how the visitor will deliver their sessions and ensure that the content is age-appropriate and accessible for our pupils. We will ask to see the materials visitors will use as well as a lesson plan in advance, so that we can ensure it meets the full range of pupils’ needs.

We will agree in advance of the session how confidentiality will work in any lesson and how a safeguarding report should be dealt with by the external visitor. It is also important that children understand how confidentiality will be handled in a lesson and what might happen if they choose to make a report.

The use of specialist visitors will be to enhance and enrich teaching, rather than as a replacement for teaching.

Before involving visitors in any aspect of RSE, teachers will ensure that:

  • the visitor understands the school’s confidentiality policy, values and approach to the educational programme
  • the visitor understands the emotional, intellectual, cultural, religious, social and ability level of the pupils involved, including where there may be a specific issue relating to child protection
  • the teacher needs to be part of the experience in order for the pupils to value the lessons and to build on the pupils’ learning after the session/s as well as answer any questions the pupils may subsequently have
  • where an organisation doesn’t have their own organisation protocol we will use the one in appendix

Monitoring and evaluating visitors’ and external agencies’ contributions

 

Use appendixoly iff unconfident of own monitoring

 

Inclusion, equality and diversity

 

We are required by law to comply with relevant requirements of the Equality Act 2010. All pupils are entitled to quality RSE that helps them build confidence and a positive sense of self, and to stay healthy. We include all pupils regardless of their age, sex, race, disability, religion or belief, gender reassignment, or sexual orientation.

All classes include pupils with different abilities and aptitudes, experiences, religious/cultural backgrounds, gender and sexual identities. To encourage pupils to participate in lessons, teachers will ensure content, approach and use of inclusive language reflects the diversity of the school community and helps each and every pupil to feel valued and included in the classroom.

 

We promote the needs and interest of all pupils. The school’s approaches to teaching and learning take into account all needs of the pupils to ensure all can access the full RSE provision. We promote social learning and expect our pupils to show a high regard for the needs of others. RSE is an important vehicle for addressing controversial and sensitive issues and ensuring equal opportunities for all.

Responding to pupils’ diverse learning needs:

Considerations will be made for:

  • religious and cultural diversity
  • differing gender needs and abilities, including SEND
  • diverse sexuality of pupils
  • homophobic/transphobic/biophobic bullying and behaviour
  • pupil’s age and physical and emotional maturity
  • pupils who are new to English

Ethnicity, religion and cultural diversity:

Our policy values the different backgrounds of all pupils in school and, in acknowledging and exploring different views and beliefs, seeks to promote respect and understanding. We encourage respect for all religions and cultures. We do not ask pupils to represent the views of a particular religious or cultural group to their peers, unless they choose to do so.

 

Single gender groups:

Our policy is sensitive to the needs of different groups. For some pupils, it may be more appropriate for them to be taught particular topics in single gender groups. We will consult parents/carers and pupils both on what is included, and on how it is delivered. This will help pupils and their families to establish what is appropriate and acceptable for them. Working in single gender groups can considerably ease concerns about RSE, and help to ensure that pupils receive the RSE to which they are entitled. Single gender groups can also help boys and girls to feel safer and less embarrassed about airing issues and discussing relationships. Where single gender groups are used for pupils, they will always be given time after the sessions to come together in a controlled environment to share and discuss what they have learnt, before leaving the classroom.

Special educational needs and disabilities (SEND):

RSE helps all pupils understand their physical and emotional development and enable them to make positive decisions in their lives. We ensure that all pupils receive RSE and we offer provision appropriate to the particular needs of our pupils, taking specialist advice where necessary. Staff will differentiate lessons to ensure that all members of the class can access the information fully. The school will use a variety of different strategies to ensure that all pupils have access to the same information.

Some pupils will be more vulnerable to abuse and exploitation than their peers, and others may be confused about what is acceptable public behaviour. These pupils will need help to develop skills to reduce the risks of being abused and exploited, and to learn what sorts of behaviour are, and are not, acceptable.

Where a pupil is receiving SEN support, schools should talk to parents regularly to set clear outcomes and review progress towards them, discuss the activities and support that will help achieve them, and identify the responsibilities of the parent, the pupil and the school. Schools should meet parents at least three times each year.

 

These discussions can build confidence in the actions being taken by the school, but they can also strengthen the impact of SEN support by increasing parental engagement in the approaches and teaching strategies that are being used. Finally, they can provide essential information on the impact of SEN support outside school and any changes in the pupil’s needs.

SEND Code of Practice: 0 – 25 years, 2014

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Plus (LGBT+):

We have a clear duty under the Equality Act 2010 to ensure that our teaching is accessible to all pupils, including those who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or + (LGBT+). Inclusive RSE will foster good relations between pupils, tackle all types of prejudice, including homophobia, and promote understanding and respect, enabling us to meet the requirements, and live the intended spirit, of the Equality Act 2010.

We will deal sensitively and honestly with issues of sexual orientation and identity, answer appropriate questions and offer support. Pupils, whatever their developing sexuality or identity, need to feel that RSE is relevant to them. Teachers will never assume that all intimate relationships are between opposite sexes. Information will be inclusive and will include LGBT people in stories, scenarios and role-plays. We will ensure all pupils can explore topics from a different gender’s point of view, and a variety of activities, including practical tasks, discussions, group activities and competitions. We will also ensure that our teaching is sensitive and age appropriate in approach and content.

Resources

 

We use primarily the Islington Primary Scheme of Work (See appendix for full scheme) and the resources recommended within it. We will focus on the needs of the pupils and our planned learning objectives.

We select carefully resources which meet these objectives. We evaluate carefully teacher resources, leaflets, online resources, children’s books and videos before using them (see checklist in appendix 4).

 

  1. Learning environment and additional non-negotiable ground rules

Staff are careful to ensure their personal beliefs and attitudes do not influence the teaching of RSE. To this end, ground rules have been agreed to provide a framework of common values within which to teach. There are clear parameters as to what will be taught in a whole-class setting, and what will be dealt with on an individual basis.

In addition to the ground rules used in PSHE, we will develop non-negotiable ground rules for lessons and discussions related to RSE. If pupils are to benefit fully from an RSE programme, they need to be confident speakers, good listeners and effective, sensitive communicators. When the needs of pupils are analysed, of overriding importance are two key areas: they need to feel safe and be safe. Additional, non-negotiable ground rules will help staff to create a safe and relaxed environment in which they do not feel embarrassed or anxious about unexpected questions or comments from the pupils. They also reduce the possibility of inappropriate behaviour and the disclosure of inappropriate personal information.

Our additional, non-negotiable ground rules will be in line with on-going and well established speaking, listening rules in class but will include:

  • Confidentiality: ‘what is said in the room, stays in the room’ except if anyone mentions something which could be harmful or put them at risk – then will have to pass the information on to help keep them safe
  • It’s not OK to ask personal questions of each other or the teacher but we can put questions in the box for later.
  • Don’t use names: if you want to ask about or share a personal story or experience, you can speak in the third person about ‘someone I know’, ‘a friend’, ‘a situation I’ve heard about/read about’
  • We will try to only ask questions related to what we are learning in the lesson.
  • We will use the anatomical terms for the sexual body parts.
  • It is ok to say pass / not join in.
  • We will listen to and respect different opinions, situations & backgrounds.
  • We will wait patiently to contribute
  • One person to speak at any one time

We will develop the ground rules through:

  • On – going practice of Coop values
  • Current speaking and listening routines in school
  • Application of current behaviour policy
  • Introduction / recap of ground rules before RSE session begins

 

  1. Assessment, recording and reporting in RSE

 

We assess pupils’ learning in RSE in line with approaches used in the rest of the curriculum (including assessment for learning). We report to parents/carers at the end of the school year on pupils’ learning and progress within RSE.

 

Assessment methods:

  • baseline or pre-assessment (essential for needs-led RSE) by use of knowledge grids formatively and I cans statements ensures prior knowledge is built on
  • needs led assessment is used to identify existing knowledge and skills of pupils
  • assessment is built into the RSE programme to inform planning through low stakes quizzes
  • pupil self-assessment is used where appropriate
  • assessment focuses on knowledge as well as skill development and attitudes thorough progress grids and I can stamen
  • all class teachers use subject learning journeys as formative assessment tools
  • identify pupils who have exceeded or fallen short of the module objectives and those that have achieved it
  • pupil progress and achievement is reported to parents/carers in end of year report
  • pupil achievement in RSE is celebrated and shared

 

 

  • Monitoring and evaluation

Monitoring activities:

  • effective PSHE leadership with a system of quality judgments and peer support
  • regular review of the RSE policy and programme
  • pupil and staff interviews/questionnaires
  • pupil/staff/parent surveys (MYMSS)
  • scrutinising staff planning
  • samples of pupils’ work

 

 

Evaluation activities:

  • teacher and pupil evaluation of lessons, units and the overall RSE programme through MHMSS
  • evaluation of contributions of external partners
  • verbal feedback and evaluation by pupils
  • sampling pupils’ work

 

  1. Safeguarding and Child Protection

Through Relationships Education (and RSE), we will teach pupils the knowledge they need to recognise and to report abuse, including emotional, physical and sexual abuse. This will be delivered by focusing on boundaries and privacy, ensuring young people understand that they have rights over their own bodies. This will also include understanding boundaries in friendships with peers and also in families and with others, in all contexts, including online.

Pupils will be taught how to report concerns and seek advice when they suspect or know that something is wrong. At all stages it will be important to balance teaching children about making sensible decisions to stay safe (including online) whilst being clear it is never the fault of a child who is abused and why victim blaming is always wrong. These subjects complement Health Education and as part of a comprehensive programme and whole.

Children have the right to:

  • say no
  • respect their own body
  • speak out and know that someone can help

When teaching any sensitive issue young people may give cause for concern. All adults are aware of our safeguarding arrangements and procedures. If the school has any reason to believe a pupil is at risk, advice from Leeds Child Protection Team will be sought.

We recognise that children are capable of abusing their peers and that peer on peer abuse can manifest in many different ways, including on-line bullying, sharing inappropriate images, initiation/hazing (an activity expected of someone joining or participating in a group that humiliates, degrades, abuses or endangers them, regardless of a person’s willingness to participate) and inappropriate/harmful sexual behaviours.

Our use of the anatomical terms for body parts helps to ensure that children are able to describe abusive behaviours if they need to.

Ground rules at the start of sessions help to establish and maintain a safe learning environment; this is important for good learning to take place, and also contributes to effective safeguarding.

 

  1. Confidentiality in the context of RSE lessons

The nature of RSE means that pupils may disclose personal information that staff will respond to appropriately.  The classroom is never a confidential place to talk, and that remains true in RSE. Pupils will be reminded that lessons are not a place to discuss their personal experiences and issues, or to ask others to do so, through the establishment of ground rules. Any visitor to the classroom will be bound by the school’s policy on confidentiality, regardless of whether they have, or their organisation has, a different policy. We will make sure visitors are aware of this, and make sure there are enough opportunities for pupils to access confidential support after the lesson if they need it.

Any information disclosed to a staff member or other responsible adult, which causes concern about the child’s safety, will be communicated to the designated person as soon as possible and always within 24 hours, in line with our safeguarding and child protection policy.

If a pupil tells a staff member something personal on a one-to-one basis outside of the classroom, our school’s confidentiality policy will help us to decide whether that person can keep that information confidential, or whether they need to seek help, advice, or refer to someone else. We will also signpost pupils and their families, where appropriate, to on and offline community, health and counselling services so pupils know where to go for confidential help and advice.

 

Techniques used in school to minimise the chance of pupils making a disclosure in an RSE lesson include:

  • depersonalising discussions
  • puppets
  • using role play to ‘act out’ scenarios
  • appropriate DVDs and TV extracts
  • case studies / discussions with invented characters
  • using third person pro-nouns
  • visits to/from outside agencies

 

  1. Support

 

We hope that pupils will feel safe in the school environment to talk to any member of staff in confidence about any areas of concern regarding their personal, social or emotional development, including matters raised by, or relating to, RSE. We promote the school ethos as one of inclusion and acceptance throughout all areas of school activity and hope that pupils respond to this by feeling comfortable to ask questions and continue their learning both in and outside of the classroom.

If parents require support in providing effective RSE at home, they should contact the class teacher in the first instance. Alternatively they can contact the PSHCE Lead / Headteacher on 0113 2 489539 or by email to brow-office@coopacademies.co.uk

 

Support for LGBT pupils

Our school environment is one of support and inclusion for all in line with our Cooperative values. We have provision in place to support pupils identifying at LGBT through our dedicated LGBT mentors. These are Mrs Blanchfied, Mrs Emmet and Mr Scott-Haigh.

 

  1. Complaints

 

Parents/carers who have complaints or concerns regarding the RSE provision should contact the school and follow the school’s complaints policy.

  1. Liaison with local media

Please contact the press and media office on: 0113 378 6007

 

  1. Local support available to schools

 

The Health and Wellbeing Service can offer support through training, bespoke lessons and in school advisory sessions.

Further information on the above training, as well as how to book, can be found at: www.schoolwellbeing.co.uk and www.leedsforlearning.co.uk

 

  1. Local and national websites

Healthy relationships, sexual consent, exploitation and abuse:

Violence within relationships:

  • The Against Violence and Abuse Project provides further information, advice and guidance: avaproject.org.uk
  • Rape Crisis provides help and advice to those affected by rape, sexual violence and child sexual abuse: rapecrisis.org.uk
  • Providing support to people in the Leeds District whose lives have been affected by domestic violence and abuse: http://www.behind-closed-doors.org.uk/

Teaching about pornography:

Teaching about sexting:

Inclusive RSE:

  • Stonewall has produced a series of packs and information for schools. Details are available at: stonewall.org.uk
  • Brook has produced packs to help those who work with diverse groups of children, available at: brook.org.uk/shop including:

Local sources of support:

www.schoolwellbeing.co.uk

www.healthyschools.org.uk

www.leedsforlearning.co.uk

http://www.leeds.gov.uk/phrc/Pages/default.aspx

www.leeds.gov.uk/phrc/Pages/public-health-training.aspx

https://www.leedsscp.org.uk/Home

http://leedssexualhealth.com

http://www.themarketplaceleeds.org.uk/

http://mesmac.co.uk/

https://www.mindmate.org.uk/

 

National sources of support:

http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Sexualhealthtopics/Pages/Sexual-health-hub.aspx https://www.brook.org.uk/

http://www.fpa.org.uk/

http://www.sexeducationforum.org.uk/

https://www.pshe-association.org.uk/

http://www.stonewall.org.uk/

http://www.bodysense.org.uk/

www.riseabove.org.uk

http://www.nat.org.uk/

https://www.nspcc.org.uk/

https://www.childline.org.uk

APPENDIX 1a                           Checklist prior to visit

Checklist for schools and agencies
TIME AND PLACE
Date(s) of Involvement: Time:

From                 to

Number of days / weeks:

Venue / room(s): Agency arrival time:
Room Layout: Agency to be greeted by:
Equipment required to be provided by the school: Session plans:

Attached: yes / no

To be forwarded to:

PEOPLE
School:

Contact details:

Agency name:

Specialism:

School address:

Tel No:

E-mail:

Agency address:

Tel No:

E-mail:

Child protection teacher:

Learning mentor / another contact:

Agency contact:

Other Contact:

Teachers to be involved: Do parents/carers need to be consulted before the session?  yes / no
Have disclosure/confidentiality procedures been discussed?  yes / no

Other policies for consideration:

Is the school satisfied with the agencies DBS / liability arrangements?  yes / no
Number of pupils:

Key Stage:

Year GroupS

Learning needs

Other / individual needs:

Intended learning outcomes: What has been taught previously?

How will the work be continued?

How will skills and progress be assessed? Who will be present?

How will they support the session?

How does the work support the CPD of teachers e.g. team teaching? Do staFf require/want any additional training?  yes / no
How will the effectiveness of the session be evaluated by pupils?

How will the effectiveness of the session be evaluated by adults?

Which routes for referral, procedures and services will pupils be signposted to?
AGREEMENTS
Have any expenses been agreed to?

yes / no

Checklist completed by:

Designation:

Date:

Meeting carried out:  in person / by phone / other  (please circle)

APPENDIX 1b         Checklist

During & after visit

Joint Evaluation Form

Please fill this in together where possible

Aim of session: Session date:

Time:

Agency:

School:

Year group:

Class:

Question Scale  1 – 10 How do you know?
1.  How well did the programme meet the needs of the pupils?
2.  How well has the work developed the skills of pupils to manage their wellbeing?
3.  How well has the input contributed to the RSE programme?
4.  Has there been an impact on staff skills and confidence?
5.  How well did the pre-planning support the session / visit?
6.  How will be the work be continued and / or adopted into the Schemes of Work next year?
7.   Were there any elements that could be improved in the future?
8.                  Any other comments?
Please keep a copy for your records.

APPENDIX 2 (this is the letter we used form BigTalk last time) – asking them to contact the school if they can’t attend the parent session or have any concerns

Relationship Education to help keep children safer

Information for Parents & Carers of children in Primary Schools

In response to our changing society and the impact of the Internet, Government has now decided to introduce statutory Relationship Education to Primary Schools, these lessons are not new and have been delivered in good Primary Schools since the last guidance in 2000, however some of the content has now been updated to help keep children safer.

School is here to help; we are engaging the support of the specialist organisation BigTalk Education, who are a Social Enterprise recognised by national leading bodies and government. They work with 3 to 18 year olds and have been involved in delivering age appropriate education of this type for over 20 years, they also deliver training for Professionals, Parents & Carers and will work with children at Brownhill on 8.01.2019

Below is some information on the Growing Up Safe programme that will be delivered to the Children by BigTalk Education, it reflects the Ofsted & SEF (the National Children’s Bureau’s Sex Education Forum) recommendations.

  • Age 3 Nursery A fun learning environment where the children are taught the differences between boys and girls, naming body parts, correct scientific words, private areas of the body, good touches and bad touches.
  • Ages 4 to 8 (Reception School Years 1, 2 & 3) Re-enforces and checks what was covered in Nursery. Using specially designed child friendly resources at the end of this session they will be able to identify happy situations and those which may be risky (e.g. other children or adults taking improper photographs of them, inappropriate touches, exposure to unsuitable media etc.) plus who they can talk to if they are worried.
  • Ages 8 to 9 (School Year 4) We cover different kinds of families, similarities and differences between boys and girls, the emotional and physical changes of growing up (puberty) how babies are made, then develop in the womb etc. (reproduction). Looking after our bodies and how to be safe and healthy are also discussed.
  • Ages 9 to 11 (School Years 5 & 6) Reproduction and puberty are re-capped, the children are given the opportunity to ask questions. As well as additional questions on puberty, they will often want more details on how babies develop and are born. It is important that they know there is someone in school as well as at home if they want help, advice or more information etc. (Information at this stage is vital to protect them as they move onto Secondary School and to provide an alternative to Google etc.

All the resources BigTalk Education use are age appropriate and help keep children protected from unwanted touches, abuse and exposure to unsuitable images etc. Research now shows that children receiving this type of education are three times more likely to speak out if they are touched inappropriately etc.

Please come along to the Parent Information Session on 8.01.2019 when a Facilitator from BigTalk Education will cover in greater detail what is included and the vital role Parents/Carers can play in keeping their children safe both now and as they progress into Secondary School. There will also be an opportunity to ask any questions as a small group or individually. Further information is also available on www.bigtalkeducation.co.uk/parents.

If you cannot attend the Parent Information Session and have any concerns regarding the above, please contact the school.

……………………..………………..……Tear off complete and return ……………………………………………

I will be attending the meeting for Parent/Carers on                                                            .

My Name                                                                                                                        .

Name(s) of child(ren)                                                                                                       .

Year Group(s)                                                                                                                  .

Our PSHE & RSE Programme in Year … / Key Stage This is the standard letter from the H&WBT

Dear …….,

We believe that promoting the health and well-being of our pupils is an important part of their overall education. We do this through our Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) course. This looks at many topics including all kinds of relationships, physical / emotional health and living in the wider world. The aim of the PSHE course is to help our pupils make safe and informed decisions during their school years and beyond.

Sex and Relationship Education (RSE) is an important part of the PSHE course. We will be teaching lessons about RSE in the …. term which will include topics such as  (puberty; relationships and communication skills; Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE); Female Genital Mutilation (FGM); body image; sexting and social media; domestic violence, consent.) During the course, pupils will be able to ask questions, which will be answered factually and in an age appropriate manner. Each pupil’s privacy will be respected, and no one will be asked to reveal personal information.

Some parts of RSE are compulsory – these are part of the National Curriculum for Science. Parents can withdraw their children from all other parts of RSE if they wish to do so. However, we believe that the presentation of sexual images in social and other media make it important that all young people have a place to discuss pressures, check facts and dispel myths. Even if a child is withdrawn, many pupils will discuss such issues with each other outside the classroom – so, rather than hear about the content second-hand, we hope all children will have the opportunity to take part in our carefully planned lessons.

Many parents and parent-related organisations support good quality RSE in school. Parents are the most important educators of young people in personal issues and many welcome the support that school can offer to supplement their home teaching.

You may find that your child starts asking questions about the topic at home, or you might want to take the opportunity to talk to your child about issues before the work is covered in school. If you have any queries about the content of the programme or resources used, please do not hesitate in contacting me at school. All materials used are available for you to browse through should you so wish.

Yours sincerely,

………

Appendix 3: Parent form: Big Talk opt out letter to parents to go here

Appendix 4 Parent information leaflet from the government

Appendix 4a (1)

Specialist RSE Providers ‘BigTalk Education’s Scheme of Work

Relationship and Sex Education Curriculum

This document details the curriculum included in our school’s RE & RSE Growing Up Safe: Whole School Approach (GUS) programme, delivered in association with relationship and sex specialist BigTalk Education.

It is a spiral curriculum therefore pupils will see the same topics throughout their school career, with each encounter increasing in complexity and reinforcing previous learning. Consequently, the topics included for Nursery and KS1 are included right the way up until year 6. The table on pages 2 and 3 of this document, show the curriculum as it relates to the topic areas included within the Department for Education’s RSE Guidance 2019, by the school years in which it is introduced. These topics repeat each year.

Table 2 starting on page 4 shows the details on the GUS programme lesson length and any reinforcement done by school staff. Please note that the statutory RSE guidance states that children must know each of the elements of the curriculum by the time they leave primary school at the end of year 6, for this reason, we repeat the GUS programme each year, building on the children’s knowledge from previous years. Therefore, some topics areas will only be reinforced once annually, by the highly trained facilitators from BigTalk Education (for example reproduction) who have specialist knowledge in how to answer children’s questions about reproduction, puberty etc. in an age-appropriate manner.   

Table 1 – Curriculum by Year Group

Growing Up Safe Programme Curriculum
Year Group (s) Topic Area New Content Introduced at Level
Nursery Families and carers. Families are important for children growing up because they can give love, security and stability. ±
How to recognise if family relationships are making them feel unhappy or unsafe, and how to seek help or advice from others if needed. ±
Caring Friendships How to recognise who to trust and who not to trust, how to judge when a friendship is making them feel unhappy or uncomfortable, managing conflict, how to manage these situations and how to seek help or advice from others, if needed. ±
Respectful Relationships The conventions of courtesy and manners. ±
In school and in wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due respect to others, including those in positions of authority. ±
Being Safe What sorts of boundaries are appropriate in friendships with peers and others. ±
That each person’s body belongs to them, and the differences between appropriate and inappropriate or unsafe physical, and other, contact. ±
How to recognise and report feelings of being unsafe or feeling bad about any adult. ±
How to ask for advice or help for themselves or others, and to keep trying until they are heard. ±
Where to get advice e.g. family, school and/or other sources. ±
Nat Curric for Science Teaching about the main external body parts. ‡
Year Group (s) Topic Area New Content Introduced at Level
Foundation/
Reception
Year 1
Families and carers. That stable, caring relationships, which may be of different types, are at the heart of happy families, and are important for children’s security as they grow up. ±
Caring Friendships How important friendships are in making us feel happy and secure, and how people choose and make friends. ±
  Healthy friendships are positive and welcoming towards others, and do not make others feel lonely or excluded. ±
  Most friendships have ups and downs, and that these can often be worked through so that the friendship is repaired or even strengthened, and that resorting to violence is never right. ±
Respectful Relationships The importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them (for example, physically, in character, personality or backgrounds), or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs. ±
  The importance of self-respect and how this links to their own happiness ±
  Different types of bullying (including cyberbullying), the impact of bullying, responsibilities of bystanders (primarily reporting bullying to an adult) and how to get help. ±
  The importance of permission-seeking and giving in relationships with friends, peers and adults. ±
Online Relationships That people sometimes behave differently online, including pretending to be someone they’re not. ±
  The rules and principles of keeping safe online, how to recognise risks, harmful content and contact, and how to report them. ±
Being Safe About the concept of privacy and the implications of it for both children and adults; including that it is not always right to keep secrets if they relate to being safe. ±
  About the law and consequences relating to content on and offline, including films, games, DVDs, TV programmes and pornography.
  The impact of viewing harmful content.
Building on previous learning plus the inclusion of the content below
Year 2
Year 3
Families and carers. That others’ families, either in school or in the wider world, sometimes look different from their family, but that they should respect those differences and know that other children’s families are also characterised by love and care. ±
Caring Friendships The characteristics of friendships, including mutual respect, truthfulness, trustworthiness, loyalty, trust, sharing interests and experiences and support with problems and difficulties. ±
Respectful Relationships Practical steps they can take in a range of different contexts to improve or support respectful relationships. ±
That some children may feel different on the inside to how they look on the outside (transgender) and that if that happened to them who they should tell.
What a stereotype is, and how stereotypes can be unfair, negative or destructive. ±
On-line relationships That the same principles apply to online relationships as face-to-face relationships, including the importance of respect for others online including when we are anonymous. ±
How to critically consider their online friendships and sources of information including awareness of the risks associated with people they have never met. ±
How information and data is shared and used online. ±
Internet Safety & Harms (Health Education) Why social media, some computer games and online gaming, for example, have age restrictions. ±
Being Safe How to respond safely and appropriately to adults they may encounter (in all contexts, including online) whom they do not know. ±
About the law and consequences relating to content on and offline, including films, games, DVDs, TV programmes and pornography.
Building on previous learning plus the inclusion of the content below
Year 4 Families and carers. The characteristics of healthy family life, commitment to each other, including in times of difficulty, protection and care for children and other family members, the importance of spending time together and sharing each other’s lives. ±
That marriage represents a formal and legally recognised commitment of two people to each other which is intended to be lifelong. ±
National Curriculum for Science Teaching about changes to the human body as it grows from birth to old age including puberty. ‡
Changing Adolescent Body (Health Education) Key facts about puberty and the changing adolescent body, particularly from age 9 through to age 11, including physical and emotional changes. ±
Reproduction About the structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems, that women have ovum and men produce sperm, when these combine a baby can be made, this is called ‘sex’, information on gestation and birth. †
Building on previous learning plus the inclusion of the content below
Year 5
Year 6
All areas Reinforcement and pupil led learning.
January 2020 Key
± Included in 2019 Guidance for Primary (Statutory)
† Included in 2019 Guidance for Primary (Optional)
‡ Included in the national curriculum for Science in KS1/KS2

4a (ii)

Coop Academy Brownhill PSHCE Scheme of Work (Adapted from Islington Scheme of Work) 

Year 1 – PSHE
Autumn 1 Spring 1 Summer 1
Physical health and wellbeing:
Fun times
Pupils learn:

●        about food that is associated with special times, in different cultures

●        about active playground games from around the world

●        about sun-safety

 

Identity, society and equality:
Me and others / Bullying
Pupils learn:

●        about what makes themselves and others special

●        about roles and responsibilities at home and school

●        about being co-operative with others

●        I know that bullying is where an unkind act happens repeatedly

●        I know the difference between falling out with someone and bullying

●        I know bullying makes others feel bad and that it is unkind

●        I can recognise types of bullying (hurting someone, unkind words, leaving others out, teasing)

●        I know how to help others if I see bullying

●        I know I should  always tell an adult if I am bullied

Mental health and emotional wellbeing: Feelings

Pupils learn:

●      about different types of feelings

●      about managing different feelings

●      about change or loss and how this can feel

 

Autumn 2 Spring 2 Summer 2
Keeping safe and managing risk:
Feeling safe
Pupils learn:

●      safety in familiar situations 

●      about personal safety

●      about people who help keep them safe outside the home

 

Drug, alcohol and tobacco education:
What do we put into and on to bodies?
Pupils learn:

●      about what can go into bodies and how it can make people feel

●      about what can go on to bodies and how it can make people feel

 

 

Careers, financial capability and economic wellbeing: My money

Pupils learn:

●  about where money comes from and making choices when spending money

●  about saving money  and how to keep it safe

●  about the different jobs people do

 

Year 2 – PSHE
Autumn 1 Spring 1 and 2 Summer 1
Mental health and emotional wellbeing: Friendship

Pupils learn:

●      about the importance of special people in their lives

●      about making friends and who can help with friendships

●      about solving problems that might arise with friendships

 

 

 

 

Mental health and emotional wellbeing: Bullying

●   I know bullying is deliberate and unfair

●   I know bullying is where an unkind act happens repeatedly

●   I know the difference between falling out with someone and bullying

●   I can tell you how it feels when someone bullies you

●   I can recognise types of bullying (hurting someone, unkind words, leaving others out, teasing about skin colour, appearance, or calling someone ‘gay’)

●   I know how to help others if I see bullying

●   I have some ways to deal with bullying if I am bullied

●   I can begin to discuss and problem solve a bullying scenario

●   I know I should  always tell an adult if I am bullied or I know someone is being bullied

 

Spring 2

 

Keeping safe and managing risk:
Indoors and outdoors

Pupils learn:

●        about keeping safe in the home, including fire safety

●        about keeping safe outside

●        about road safety 

 

 

Physical health and wellbeing:
What keeps me healthy?
Pupils learn:

●      about eating well

●      about the importance of physical activity, sleep and rest

about people who help us to stay healthy and well and about basic health and hygiene routines

Autumn 2 Summer 2
 

Sex and relationship education:
Boys and girls, families

Pupils learn:

●  to understand and respect the differences and similarities between people

●  about the biological differences between male and female animals and their role in the life cycle

●  the biological differences between male and female children

●  about growing from young to old and that they are growing and changing

●  that everybody needs to be cared for and ways in which they care for others

●  about different types of family and how their home-life is special

Drug, alcohol and tobacco education: Medicines and me

Pupils learn:

●                  why medicines are taken

●                  where medicines come from

●                  about keeping themselves safe around medicines

Asthma lesson for Year 2, 3 or 4

●        that medicines can be used to manage and treat medical conditions such as asthma, and that it is important to follow instructions for their use

Year 3 – PSHE
Autumn 1 Spring 1 Summer 1
Mental health and emotional wellbeing: Strengths and challenges

Pupils learn:

●        about celebrating achievements and setting personal goals

●        about dealing with put-downs

●        about positive ways to deal with set-backs

 

 

 

 

 

Drug, alcohol and tobacco education: Tobacco is a drug

Pupils learn:

●    the definition of a drug and that drugs (including medicines) can be harmful to people

●    about the effects and risks of smoking tobacco and secondhand smoke

●    about the help available for people to remain smoke free or stop smoking

Asthma lesson for Year 2, 3 or 4

that medicines can be used to manage and treat medical conditions such as asthma, and that it is important to follow instructions for their use

Careers, financial capability and economic wellbeing: Saving, spending and budgeting

Pupils learn:

●    about what influences people’s choices about spending and saving money

●    how people can keep track of their money

●    about the world of work

 

Autumn 2 Spring 2 Summer 2
Physical health and wellbeing:
What helps me choose?
Pupils learn:

●    about making healthy choices about food and drinks

●    about how branding can affect what foods people choose to buy

●    about keeping active and some of the challenges of this

 

 

 

Keeping safe and managing risk:
Bullying – see it, say it, stop it
Pupils learn:

●   I know that bullying can involve a power imbalance within a relationship – older, stronger, cleverer, appearance ect

●   I can describe why some people bully others – they may be unhappy/being bullied themselves

●   I know what to do if I witness bullying and understand how important the bystander is to help to reduce bullying

●   I can begin to recognise and discuss examples of bullying from my own experience and suggest better strategies to deal with them

●   I can explain and describe a range of strategies to deal with bullying if I or someone else is bullied

 

Identity, society and equality:
Celebrating difference

Pupils learn:

●    Pupils learn about valuing the similarities and differences between themselves and others

●    Pupils learn about what is meant by community

●    Pupils learn about belonging to groups

 

Year 4 – PSHE
Autumn 1 Spring 1 Summer 1
Identity, society and equality:
Democracy
Pupils learn:

●  about Britain as a democratic society

●  about how laws are made

●  learn about the local council

 

 

Keeping safe and managing risk:
Bullying – see it, say it, stop it
●   I know the different types of prejudice and discrimination(racism, sexism, disablist, homophobia, transphobia) and how they can lead to bullying

●   I know that bullying can occur on-line or in person (See detailed E-safety plans as part of our ICT)

●   I know how to recognise and challenge discriminatory language in school

●   I can describe the impact and consequences of bullying on others and explain some of the negative effects it can have

●   I can explain some ways that a group or person can have power over another.

●   I can discuss examples of bullying from my own and others’ experience and reflect on better strategies to deal with them

●   I can describe why some people bully others – they may be unhappy/ bullied themselves

●   I know some ways to encourage children who use bullying behaviours to make other choices

●   I know a wide range of strategies for managing my feelings in bullying situations, and for problem solving when I am part of one.

●   When using a computer children understand digital effects manipulation and how they relate to online bullying. (See detailed E-safety plans as part of our ICT scheme)

Sex and relationship education:
Growing up and changing
Pupils learn:

●  about the way we grow and change throughout the human lifecycle

●  about the physical changes associated with puberty

●  about menstruation and wet dreams

●  about the impact of puberty in physical hygiene and strategies for managing this

●  how puberty affects emotions and behaviour and strategies for dealing with the changes associated with puberty

●  strategies to deal with feelings in the context of relationships

●  to answer each other’s questions about puberty with confidence, to seek support and advice when they need it

 

 

Summer 2

 

Drug, alcohol and tobacco education:
Making choices

Pupils learn:

●  that there are drugs (other than medicines) that are common in everyday life, and why people choose to use them

●  about the effects and risks of drinking alcohol

●  about different patterns of behaviour that are related to drug use

Asthma lesson for Year 2, 3 or 4

that medicines can be used to manage and treat medical conditions such as asthma, and that it is important to follow instructions for their use

 

 

 

Autumn 2 Spring 2
Physical health and wellbeing:
What is important to me?
Pupils learn:

●  why people may eat or avoid certain foods (religious, moral, cultural or health reasons)

●  about other factors that contribute to people’s food choices (such as ethical farming, fair trade and seasonality)

●  about the importance of getting enough sleep

Keeping safe and managing risk:
Playing safe
Pupils learn:

●  how to be safe in their computer gaming habits

●  about keeping safe near roads, rail, water, building sites and around fireworks

●  about what to do in an emergency and basic emergency first aid procedures                                                                                                              

 

Year 5 – PSHE
Autumn 1 Spring 1 Summer 1
Physical health and wellbeing:
In the media
Pupils learn:

●  that messages given on food adverts can be misleading

●  about role models

●  about how the media can manipulate images and that these images may not reflect reality

Keeping safe and managing risk:
When things go wrong: Bullying

●   I know the different types of prejudice and discrimination(racism, sexism, disablist, homophobia, transphobia) and how they can lead to bullying

●   I know how to recognise and challenge discriminatory language in school

●   I can describe the impact and consequences of bullying on others and explain some of the negative effects it can have

●   I can discuss examples of bullying from my own and others’ experience and reflect on better strategies to deal with them

●   I can describe why some people bully others – they may be unhappy/ bullied themselves

●   I know some ways to encourage children who use bullying behaviours to make other choices

●   I know a wide range of strategies for managing my feelings in bullying situations, and for problem solving when I am part of one.

 

 

 

Keeping safe and managing risk:
When things go wrong
Pupils learn:

●  about keeping safe online

●  that violence within relationships is not acceptable

●  about problems that can occur when someone goes missing from home

 

 

Careers, financial capability and economic wellbeing: Borrowing and earning money

Pupils learn:

●  that money can be borrowed but there are risks associated with this

●  about enterprise

●  what influences people’s decisions about careers

 

 

 

 

Autumn 2 Spring 2 Summer 2
Drug, alcohol and tobacco education: Different influences

Pupils learn:

●  about the risks associated with smoking drugs, including cigarettes, e-cigarettes, shisha and cannabis

●  about different influences on drug use – alcohol, tobacco and nicotine products

●  strategies to resist pressure from others about whether to use drugs – smoking drugs and alcohol 

Mental health and emotional wellbeing: Dealing with feelings

Pupils learn:

●  about a wide range of emotions and feelings and how these are experienced in the body

●  about times of change and how this can make people feel

●  about the feelings associated with loss, grief and bereavement

Identity, society and equality:
Stereotypes, discrimination and prejudice (including tackling homophobia)
Pupils learn:

●  about stereotyping, including gender stereotyping

●  about prejudice and discrimination and how this can make people feel

Year 6 – PSHE
Autumn 1 and 2 Spring 1 Summer 1
Identity, society and equality:
Human rights
Pupils learn:

●  about  people who have moved to the area from other places, (including the experience of refugees)

●  about human rights and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child

●  about homelessness

 

Sex and relationship education:
Healthy relationships / How a baby is made

Pupils learn:

●  about the changes that occur during puberty

●  to consider different attitudes and values around gender stereotyping and sexuality and consider their origin and impact

●  what values are important to them in relationships and to appreciate the importance of friendship in intimate relationships

●  about human reproduction in the context of the human lifecycle

●  how a baby is made and grows (conception and pregnancy)

●  about roles and responsibilities of carers and parents 

●  to answer each other’s questions about sex and relationships with confidence, where to find support and advice when they need it

Additional lessons: (schools will want to consider including these lessons, as part of SRE policy development)

●  some myths and misconceptions about HIV,  who it affects and how it is transmitted

●  about how the risk of HIV can be reduced

that contraception can be used to stop a baby from being conceived

Keeping safe and managing risk:

 

Keeping safe – out and about

Pupils learn:

●  about feelings of being out and about in the local area with increasing independence

●  about recognising and responding to peer pressure 

●  about the consequences of anti-social behaviour (including gangs and gang related behaviour)

FGM

Pupils learn:

●  about the importance for girls to be protected against FGM

Mental health and emotional wellbeing:

Healthy minds

 

Pupils learn:

●  what mental health is

●  about what can affect mental health and some ways of dealing with this

●  about some everyday ways to look after mental health

●  about the stigma and discrimination that can surround mental health

Spring 2 Summer 2
 

Drug, alcohol and tobacco education: Weighing up risk

Pupils learn:

●  about the risks associated with using different drugs, including tobacco and nicotine products, alcohol, solvents, medicines and other legal and illegal drugs

●  about assessing the level of risk in different situations involving drug use

about ways to manage risk in situations involving drug use

Keeping safe and managing risk:
Bullying – see it, say it, stop it
●   I can give examples of bullying from my own, others’ experience and case studies and reflect on better strategies to deal with them

 

●   I know some ways to encourage children who use bullying behaviours to make other choices and can reflect on my own choices

 

●   I know a wide range of strategies for managing my feelings in bullying situations, and for problem solving when I am part of one.

 

●   I know that differences and similarities between people arise from a number of factors, including cultural, ethnic, racial and religious diversity, gender, sexuality and disability and describe why some cultures hold their views

●   I know some case studies of discrimination and prejudice from history that involve a power imbalance and how these were challenged (Stonewall, Suffragettes, Mandella)

●   I know about the life of LGBT role model Alan Turing and his persecution due to his sexuality  and can describe the impact of  this discrimination

●   I can consider how race and  LGBT rights across the world are different and bound by culture and religion